Legislative Updates

 

 

Dates of the First Session of the 54th Legislature:

March 16 Session ends (noon)
April 5 The Governor has until this date to sign or veto legislation approved in the last three days of the legislative session.  Legislation not acted upon by governor is pocket vetoed
June 14 Effective date of legislation not a general appropriation bill or a bill carrying an emergency clause or other specified date

 

2019 Updates

 

Preliminary 2019 Legislative Summary

Teacher Evaluation

Neither proposed bill dealing with a new teacher evaluation system passed the legislature, largely because agreement could not be reached among various stakeholders about which changes were best. Although both House Bill 212 and Senate Bill 247 had positive aspects, in the final analysis it is likely wiser to create a new evaluation system by Public Education Department rule with intense participation by stakeholders.  That way we will have some time to experiment and make changes before we create something with the permanence of statute. 

TEACHERS CAN REST ASSURED the NMTeach evaluation system is NOT remaining in place. The new PED has already started on their work to gather stakeholders to have a voice in creating a new evaluation system. One of Governor Lujan Grisham’s first acts was to issue an executive order outlawing the use of PARCC scores in teacher evaluation. 

The Governor also signed House Bill 227 early in the session.  House Bill 227 prohibits a school district from negatively affecting a teacher’s annual performance evaluation for the teacher’s use of up to 10 days of sick leave and any amount of personal leave.  We will find a receptive ear to keep teacher attendance out of any new evaluation system.

The PED does not need a law to pass to change the evaluation system – the old one was created through rule and the one replacing it offer more flexibility if created the same way.  So, it’s not a defeat for our cause that the two evaluation bills (SB247 and HB 212) each passed one chamber, but not the other.  

Please circulate the article below, and use it as a “trigger” for you to engage with non-members in conversation about joining. 

Change in grading teachers dies in New Mexico Legislature | Education | santafenewmexican.com

The Facts About Salary Increases

In good news:  SB1 and HB5 the identical omnibus bills with direction for many of the key education priorities funded in the budget bill, House Bill 2, passed both chambers!  While both bills increase at-risk funding substantially and contain new minimum salary levels for teachers and principals. The minimum salary levels for teachers remain 40,000 at level 1; 50,000 at level 2; and 60,000 at level 3. Level 3-B licensed principals and assistant principals get the same minimum as a level 3-A teachers multiplied by a responsibility factor already contained in statute, section B of Section 22-10A-2 NMSA 1978 .

The final version of House bill 2, the budget bill, contained in the conference committee report worked out between the two houses, contains a required 6% salary increase for all categories of public school employees.  Thank the House leadership for listening to us and making sure that there was a required 6% for each employee, not an average for all employees.

SB1 and HB5 contain direction for the funding for extended learning time of ten days.  The funds only cover about one third of the teaching population; districts must apply for this addition funding.  If implemented in a district, teachers must be paid at their base rate of pay (after salary increases) for each day worked; the same is true for districts who choose to implement k-5 plus extended learning time.  The new minimums and the 6% salary increase are not dependent on working addition days!

 VERY IMPORTANT NOTE:  the raises everyone will get is more than enough to pay for the membership dues of any school employee – bus drivers, custodians, EA’s and teachers, etc. for the rest of their career (the raises become part of your base pay for the rest of your career).  This link leads to the form you will need to invite nonmember colleagues to join when you create the opportunity to share this great news and enroll a grateful colleague!

More Rights for Educational Support Professionals

The legislature sent House Bill 47 to the Governor.  The measure will provide a probationary period of one year for Educational Support Professionals (classified employees and education assistants) instead of the current three-year period. Ask the Governor to sign this important legislation

We will soon add an updated compilation of all the bills materially affecting Public Education that passed both Houses of the Legislature. Check back in a few days.

Legislative Update, Thursday, March 14, 2019

Legislation is moving fast and furious in the final days of the session.  As legislators drag their tired bodies into late night/early morning meetings and floor sessions, NEA-New Mexico is there support our allies and to be sure students are front and forward. 

The numerous Committees are mostly done with their business and legislators are spending the vast majority of their time on the floor of their respective chambers.  To keep track directly of what’s happening over the last day and a half (the session closes Saturday at noon), check https://www.nmlegis.gov/Calendar/Session.   The agendas change frequently at this point. 

If you’ve been tracking many specific bills on hot topics, like salaries, please know that while they may not have been voted down, formally in a committee, this does not mean those bills are moving forward.  There is no indication on the legislative website when a bills is dying a slow death by not being moved forward.

In good news:  SB1 and HB5 the “mirror” omnibus bills with funding for many of the key education priorities included have passed both chambers!  (See prior updates for details, please). While both bills increase at-risk funding substantially and contain new minimum salary levels for teachers and principals, the future automatic increases in minimums in House Bill 5 wee removed by the Senate, so the levels remain 40,000 at level 1; 50,000 at level 2; and 60,000 at level 3.

The senate changed House bill 2, the budget bill  to provide an average 6% salary increase for all categories of employees.  The House version required that each teacher get 6%.  A conference committee will resolve differences between the two versions.  So as of now, at least an average 6% is required for all categories of employees and the new teacher minimums are in place.  Funding for extended learning time of ten days is in place for about one third of the teaching population; districts must apply for this addition funding.  Teachers must be paid at their base rate of pay (after salary increases) for each day worked; the same is true for districts who choose to implement k-5 plus extended learning time.  The new minimums and the 6% salary increase are not dependent on working addition days!

HB6 passed Senate Corporations Committee this morning as amended by Sen. Sanchez. His amendments:

o   Got rid of the new progressive Personal Income rates in their entirety.

o   Got rid of the repeal of the 50% capital gains deduction.

o   Reduced the Working Families Tax Credit increase from 20% to only 15% (the bigger this is, the more it helps every single education employee).

o   Limited the Motor Vehicle Tax crease to only 3.5% instead of 4.2% and removed the modest vehicle registration fee increase. 

o   Made changes on cig and tobacco taxes to reduce the impact, among a few other things. 

o   Instead of raising over $300M in revenue like HB6, the amended version raises less than $100M

HB6 has to be reported out as amended to the floor, then it will have to go to SFC, then the senate floor. If it passes these, then it will go to conference committee where negotiations can happen between select House and Senate members. There is a possibility it could be removed from SFC and head straight to the Senate floor. 

Weekend Legislative Update, March 9, 2019

As the legislature moves into its last week, much work remains to be done. However, legislators continued working this weekend. 

Senate Bill 229, sponsored by Senator Mimi Stewart, repeals the A-B-C-D-F Schools Rating Act and replaces it with the School Support and Accountability Act.  Senate Bill 229  cleared its next-to-last hurdle this morning when it received a do-pass recommendation from the House Education Committee.  It next goes to the House floor. This bill puts an end to the only piece of reform legislation that Governor Susana Martinez was ever able to push through the legislature.   (unfortunately many of her reforms were instituted by rules, many of which must be undone as we move forward with a new Public Education Secretary.)

Senate Bill 229  outlines academic and school climate indicators on which schools would be evaluated but leaves the weighting of those factors to the department. The act requires PED to create an online platform – a “dashboard” – for providing the public with information on each public school and its performance.  The proposal requires that schools be designated as in “need of traditional support”, “targeted support”, “comprehensive support”, or “more rigorous intervention”, compared with the five designations in existing law. The designations reflect an ESSA requirement that state education departments, in order to continue receiving Title I federal funding for school districts and schools with high percentages of low-income students, identify schools in need of improvement as either “comprehensive support and improvement” schools or “targeted support and improvement” schools. PED reports, based on data from the 2017-2018 school year, 642 schools, or 76 percent of all schools, would have been designated traditional-support schools, 111 as targeted-support schools, 86 as a comprehensive-support schools, and four as in need of more rigorous interventions.

Tell House members  to support   Senate Bill 229.  Tell them that we need the approach in the bill.  We must support and improve our schools, not shame and brand them.

House Bill 589, Community Schools, is on the House Floor Calendar and could be acted upon at any time.  The bill calls for federal, state, and tribal governments to partner with community-based organizations to improve the coordination, delivery, effectiveness, and efficiency of services,
align and leverage community resources, and integrate funding streams. Community school initiatives would be required to work with a lead partner agency, conduct an annual community needs and assets assessment, and implement a program framework

 Ask all House Members to support HB 589, using thses talking points:

  • The community school framework is the delivery mechanism to ensure that, according to the Yazzie/Martinez ruling, all at-risk students will have the resources, programs, services and opportunities necessary for a sufficient education both in and out of the classroom.
  • A local return on investment study shows that for every dollar invested in the salary of a Community School Coordinator the return in net benefits is approximately $7.11. 
  • HB 589 creates needed alignment with the current evidence base of highly effective community schools as well as a clear understanding of the community schools framework.

Even with this weekend’s work, much remains to be done.   Neither the budget nor either of of the omnibus education bills has passed both Houses of the legislature.  

Both the House and Senate omnibus bills passed their respective chambers last week.  Both now move to the Finance committee of the opposite chamber to work out the few differences in the bills.

Let both the Senate Finance Committee and the House Appropriations Committee know that we prefer the minimum salary levels in House Bill 5  

Senate Bill 1  and House Bill 5  passed yesterday.    Provisions of both bills would increase the at-risk index cost differential from 0.13 to 0.25 and generate 27.1 thousand new program units in FY20, valued at $113 million based on the FY19 preliminary unit value of $4,159.23.

They both place the former k-3 plus extended learning program in the funding formula as K-5 plus.  Districts may apply for the funding for this program and for additional extended learning time program for other levels.  If teachers work in these programs, they must be paid at their daily rate of pay for each day of the extended program.

Current law provides a minimum salary of $36 thousand for level one teachers, $44 thousand for level two teachers, and $54 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors. 

Senate Bill 1   bill would increase minimum teacher salaries to $40 thousand for level one teachers, $50 thousand for level two teachers, and $60 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors, and index minimum salaries for principals and assistant principals to the minimum salary of a level three-A teacher.

House Bill 5 establishes a gradual increase in minimum salaries for teachers over four years as follows:

  • Level 1: $40,000 (FY20), $42,000 (FY21), $44,000 (FY22), and $46,000 (FY23);
  • Level 2: $50,000(FY20), $52,000 (FY21), $54,000 (FY22), and $56,000 (FY23); and
  • Level 3-A: $60,000 (FY20), $62,000 (FY21), $64,000 (FY22), and $66,000 (FY23)

Additionally, the budget bill,  House Bill 2, contains a required 6% salary for all teachers and principals and an average 6% increase for all school employees.

As We Place Major Reforms in Place, We Need a Revenue System to Sustain Them.  NEA-NM’s Point of View on revenue increases is below:

Greatly increased, stable and steady revenue is the only way New Mexico can invest in the education, health, public safety, and transportation that families and businesses need to succeed.  Why would we raise taxes when we have such a huge surplus?   

Simple: House Bill 6 (HB6) is the best solution to the oil and gas roller-coaster we’ve been on. We need to reform our revenue system to make the needed investments in education during both boom and bust times.  School funding is down dramatically since the recession of 2008, higher education funds have been cut by a third.

State District Court Judge Sarah Singleton’s ruling in the Yazzie/Martinez lawsuit about providing a sufficient education for New Mexico’s children makes clear every student must be provided an equal opportunity to succeed.  Sufficient education funding to provide this base of support is a Constitutional Right and the judge stated a lack of funds is not a viable excuse for not providing that right.  Should there be program cuts in the future if revenue shortfalls happen, they will likely be in health, economic development, roads, land and water protection, and other areas of state spending.  So, the revenue in the tax legislation is for education, but it’s also for other critical areas of state services.  New Mexico needs a stable revenue base.

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Chair, Representative Jim Trujillo answered the “why now,” question from Republican legislative colleagues. “You left us a mess.  We have a $400 million deficit in education, even though it’s like a billion that we’re behind … that should have been taken care in the last eight years.  Also, we’re appropriating $400 million for our roads because you let them deteriorate.”  

Emerging legislative champions for New Mexico students, Representatives Susan Herrera and Christine Chandler took on common myths about the relative position of states on taxation and their economic growth rates.  The faster growing states,” notes Representative Chandler, are doing so “because they have strong public education systems, they invest in quality of life, including a strong infrastructure.”  Representative Herrera referenced last November’s electoral sweep of fifteen democrats into the House.  “We need to support what the people of this state need—this is not just a Democratic or Republican concern,” noted Herrera, “we all need to be part of the solution.” 

Republican icon, former President, Ronald Reagan was applauded by House Speaker Egolf for originating one major piece of the bill: The Working Families Tax Credit (WFTC).  HB6 doubles the WFTC, helping to reduce stress which impairs the ability of New Mexico students to succeed. 

“The most fundamental principle of tax policy is adequately funding government, notes Representative Moe Maestas who added, “This bill is adequately funding constitutional government.”  

It’s time to change course.  We are grateful that the oil and gas industries have provided tremendous resources to our state! However, we must break the all too familiar oil and gas boom-and-bust cycle with a stable revenue system.  We must be able to confidently invest for the long-term, not relying on only one revenue source.  Support HB6!

Legislative Update, Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Omnibus Education Bills Move to Opposite Chambers

Both the House and Senate omnibus bills passed their respective chambers on Tuesday.  Both now move to the Finance committee of the opposite chamber to work out the few differences in the bills.

Let both the Senate Finance Committee and the House Appropriations Committee know that we prefer the minimum salary levels in House Bill 5  

Senate Bill 1  and House Bill 5  passed yesterday.    Provisions of both bills would increase the at-risk index cost differential from 0.13 to 0.25 and generate 27.1 thousand new program units in FY20, valued at $113 million based on the FY19 preliminary unit value of $4,159.23.

They both place the former k-3 plus extended learning program in the funding formula as K-5 plus.  Districts may apply for the funding for this program and for additional extended learning time program for other levels.  If teachers work in these programs, they must be paid at their daily rate of pay for each day of the extended program.

Current law provides a minimum salary of $36 thousand for level one teachers, $44 thousand for level two teachers, and $54 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors. 

Senate Bill 1   bill would increase minimum teacher salaries to $40 thousand for level one teachers, $50 thousand for level two teachers, and $60 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors, and index minimum salaries for principals and assistant principals to the minimum salary of a level three-A teacher.

House Bill 5 establishes a gradual increase in minimum salaries for teachers over four years as follows:

  • Level 1: $40,000 (FY20), $42,000 (FY21), $44,000 (FY22), and $46,000 (FY23);
  • Level 2: $50,000(FY20), $52,000 (FY21), $54,000 (FY22), and $56,000 (FY23); and
  • Level 3-A: $60,000 (FY20), $62,000 (FY21), $64,000 (FY22), and $66,000 (FY23)

Additionally, the budget bill,  House Bill 2, contains a required 6% salary for all teachers and principals and an average 6% increase for all school employees.

As We Place Major Reforms in Place, We Need a Revenue System to Sustain Them

 HB 6 sponsored by Representative Jim R. Trujillo is the House omnibus tax bill (a list of the bill’s components can be found here) passed the House and now moves to the Senate.

HB 6 will make our tax system fairer for working families while raising $300 million in stable, reliable revenue to invest in our schools, roads, mental health system, and more. Most of the new revenue would come from those with the highest incomes and out-of-state corporations. It does this by undoing some of the disastrous tax cuts of the past 15 years that have made us too reliant on the boom-and-bust cycle of the oil and gas industry. HB 6 passed the House on a 40-25 vote and now goes to the Senate, where it will face a  tougher audience.

Action Needed: Please call members of the Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee and urge them to support HB 6.

What You Might Say:

I’m calling to urge the senator to support HB 6 to raise at least $300 million in reliable revenue. New Mexico’s hard-working families have had to shoulder too much of the responsibility for paying taxes to support the public infrastructure and services that we all rely upon. It’s time to ask the highest incomes and out-of-state corporations to step up and help get us off the boom-and-bust revenue cycle of the oil and gas industry.

Contact Info:

Bill to reduce insurance premiums for Educational Support Personnel Receives a do-pass recommendation, but still has no funding

House Bill 511, Group Insurance Salary Amounts,  sponsored by Representative Natalie Figueroa, would reduce health insurance premiums for the lowest paid employees by  increasing the amount of insurance premium that the school district pay on behalf of those employees as follows:

Employer Contribution by Income Level

 

Current

HB511

Employer

Contribution

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

75%

$           ‐

$ 15,000

$             ‐

$     20,000

70%

$ 15,000

$ 20,000

$      20,000

$     25,000

65%

$ 20,000

$ 25,000

$      25,000

$     30,000

60%

$ 25,000

 

$      30,000

 

 

The measure received a do-pass in  the House State Government, Elections, and Indian Affairs Committee on Tuesday.  It could move to the House floor.  However, the sponsor is still attempting to secure necessary funding for the bill and if that funding is not found, she will likely not attempt to pass it as an unfunded mandate for school districts in the New Mexico School Insurance Authority.

Legislative Update, Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Bill to reduce insurance premiums for Educational Support Personnel to be heard tomorrow

House Bill 511, Group Insurance Salary Amounts,  sponsored by Representative Natalie Figueroa, would reduce health insurance premiums for the lowest paid employees by  increasing the amount of insurance premium that the school district pay on behalf of those employees as follows:

 

Employer Contribution by Income Level

 

Current

HB511

Employer

Contribution

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

75%

$           ‐

$ 15,000

$             ‐

$     20,000

70%

$ 15,000

$ 20,000

$      20,000

$     25,000

65%

$ 20,000

$ 25,000

$      25,000

$     30,000

60%

$ 25,000

 

$      30,000

 

 

It received a unanimous do-pass in House Education Committee.   It will be heard in  the House State Government, Elections, and Indian Affairs Committee tomorrow.  Ask committee members to support this important measure to help our lowest paid colleagues.

Senate Bill 1 passed the Senate today.  This is the Senate’s version of an omnibus education bill.  It provides minimum salaries for the three tired salary system.   The bill would increase minimum teacher salaries to $40 thousand for level one teachers, $50 thousand for level two teachers, and $60 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors, and index minimum salaries for principals and assistant principals to the minimum salary of a level three-A teacher. Current law provides a minimum salary of $36 thousand for level one teachers, $44 thousand for level two teachers, and $54 thousand for level three-A teachers and counselors.  Additionally, the budget bill House Bill 2 contains a required 6% salary for all teachers and principals and an average 6% increase for all school employees.

Other provisions of the bill would increase the at-risk index cost differential from 0.13 to 0.25 and generate 27.1 thousand new program units in FY20, valued at $113 million based on the FY19 preliminary unit value of $4,159.23.

The measure puts the former k-3 plus extended learning program in the funding formula as K-5 plus.  Districts may apply for the funding for this program and for additional extended learning time program for other levels.  If teachers work in these programs, they must be paid at their daily rate of pay for each day of the extended program.

Update, Monday March 4, 2019

Congratulations to our new Secretary of Public Education, Dr. Karen Trujillo, Who was confirmed this afternoon by the Full Senate.

Bill to protect ESP employees moves on

House Bill 47 will provide a probationary period of one year for Educational Support Professionals (classified employees and education assistants) instead of the current three-year period.  It received a do pass recommendation in the Senate Education Committee this morning and moves to the Senate Judiciary Committee.  Tell committee members to support this important employee rights bill.

Important revenue bill moves to the Senate

 HB 6 sponsored by Representative Jim R. Trujillo is the House omnibus tax bill (a list of the bill’s components can be found here) passed the House and now moves to the Senate.

HB 6 will make our tax system fairer for working families while raising $300 million in stable, reliable revenue to invest in our schools, roads, mental health system, and more. Most of the new revenue would come from those with the highest incomes and out-of-state corporations. It does this by undoing some of the disastrous tax cuts of the past 15 years that have made us too reliant on the boom-and-bust cycle of the oil and gas industry. HB 6 passed the House on a 40-25 vote and now goes to the Senate, where it will face a  tougher audience.

Action Needed: Please call members of the Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee and urge them to support HB 6.

What You Might Say:

I’m calling to urge the senator to support HB 6 to raise at least $300 million in reliable revenue. New Mexico’s hard-working families have had to shoulder too much of the responsibility for paying taxes to support the public infrastructure and services that we all rely upon. It’s time to ask the highest incomes and out-of-state corporations to step up and help get us off the boom-and-bust revenue cycle of the oil and gas industry.

Contact Info:

Another Important Bill will be heard on Wednesday in  the Senate Education Committee.

HB 121 ensures public school students have access to health, counseling, and behavioral health services and on Wednesday, March 4th, it will be heard in the Senate Education Committee. 

Please call the Senate Education Committee members and let them know you support HB 121 and want our students to have these critical services, so they are ready to learn and succeed. 

Sen. Mimi Stewart | (505) 986-4726 | mimi.stewart@nmlegis.gov
Sen. William Soules | (505) 986-4834 | bill.soules@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Michael Padilla | (505) 986-4267 | michael.padilla@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Gabriel Ramos | (505) 986-4863 | gabriel.ramos@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Bill O’Neill | (505) 986-4260 | oneillsd13@billoneillfornm.com
Sen. Candace Gould | (505) 986-4266 | candace.gould@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Craig Brandt | (505) 986-4385 | craig.brandt@nmlegis.gov
Sen. Greg Fulfer | (505) 986-4278 | gregg.fulfer@nmlegis.gov
Sen. John Pinto | (505) 986-4835  

Legislative Update, Wednesday, February 27, 2019

 HB 6 sponsored by Representative Jim R. Trujillo is the House omnibus tax bill (a list of the bill’s components can be found here). Received a do-pass recommendation in the House Tax and  Revenue Committee this morning.  The bill will now move to the House floor.  Tell all House members that this important legislation must pass. 

Here are some revenue talking points, but the key messages to get to legislators are to let them know you support HB 6 and remind them that:

  1. Raising at least $300 million in new, stable, and sustainable revenue will help us get off the boom-to-bust oil and gas cycle and ensure we can achieve an education moonshot.
  2. We need to restore fairness and progressivity in our tax code to help New Mexico’s families.

The following legislation received do-pass recommendations in the House Appropriations and Finance Committee  yesterday afternoon.  They all now move to the full house of representatives,  Messages for each piece of legislation is contained below the title.

  • HB 111 – Cultural and Linguistic Education Support
    We know that students in rural New Mexico are underserved by the public education system, despite their success being just as critical to New Mexico’s future. Funding for rural school districts and cooperatives from HB 111 will build the capacity for teachers in these areas to gain the skills necessary to teach in bilingual and multicultural classrooms  
  • HB 120 – Bilingual Teacher Preparation Act
    Without bilingual teachers, we cannot adequately address the needs of our bilingual students. HB 120 will increase the number of bilingual and TESOL-endorsed teachers in New Mexico by making it possible to receive grants to help pay for degrees or endorsements in bilingual/multicultural education or TESOL.  
  • HB 159 – Multicultural Education Framework
    Aligns the New Mexico Indian Education Act, Hispanic Education Act, and Bilingual Multicultural Act to establish a foundation in the public education system for supporting the education of culturally and linguistically diverse students across New Mexico. 

 

Legislative Update, Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Re-framing Early Education in New Mexico

You have a unique opportunity to make a difference on a key bill of this session, and we hope you will take a minute to call or email Members of the Senate Finance Committee.  Please ask Senators to vote in Senate Finance for SB 22 creating an Early Childhood Department, but only with the Senate Education Committee Amendments retained. Let Senators know a  statement of support for the bill as amended in the Senate Education Committee. Senate Bill (SB) 22 passed the Senate Education Committee with an amendment NEA-NM .  The amendment ensures quality remains at PED supervised pre-K for four-year old pre-K students (run in and by K-12 Districts)!  It also insures that funding for these programs remains public.  Private sector providers, whom the new Early Childhood Department would serve, will try to remove the Amendment in the Senate Finance Committee. To be clear, the bill still consolidates early childhood programs and providers under one roof – the new department rather than being run by multiple departments which have other priorities.

Click on the Senator’s name for contact information:

 

Title

Name

District

Party

Senator

John Arthur Smith

35

D

Senator

Carlos R. Cisneros

6

D

Senator

William F. Burt

33

R

Senator

Pete Campos

8

D

Senator

Jacob R. Candelaria

26

D

Senator

Gay G. Kernan

42

R

Senator

George K. Munoz

4

D

Senator

Nancy Rodriguez

24

D

Senator

Sander Rue

23

R

Senator

John M. Sapien

9

D

Senator

James P. White

19

R

Senator

Steven P. Neville

2

R

 

Bills Important to Educational Support Professionals Advance

House Bill 431, Termination of School Employees sponsored by Representative Linda Trujillo, received a unanimous do pass recommendation today in the House Labor, Veterans, and Military Affairs Committee.  This measure will allow classified school employees to have a one-year probationary period.  Teachers will continue to gain due process on accepting a third consecutive contract.  However, some due process standards were strengthened for all employees. This measure goes next to the  House Education Committee.  Ask committee members to support this pro-employee legislation. 

House Bill 511, Group Insurance Salary Amounts,  sponsored by Representative Natalie Figueroa, would increase the amount of insurance premium that the lowest paid employees  have paid by the school district as follows:

Employer Contribution by Income Level

 

Current

HB511

Employer

Contribution

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

Min.

Income

Max.

Income

75%

$           ‐

$ 15,000

$             ‐

$     20,000

70%

$ 15,000

$ 20,000

$      20,000

$     25,000

65%

$ 20,000

$ 25,000

$      25,000

$     30,000

60%

$ 25,000

 

$      30,000

 

 

It received a unanimous do-pass in House Education Committee Saturday morning.  It goes next to the House State Government, Elections, and Indian Affairs Committee.  Ask committee members to support this important measure to help our lowest paid colleagues.

This alert comes from our friends at Voices for Children

Hi all, we need some immediate action for the HB 6 sub, the House omnibus tax bill (a list of the sub’s components can be found here). Business and the well-connected are coming out in full force with complaints about the new-and-significantly-improved bill that was subbed on Monday and putting extreme pressure onto HTRC members to pull the bill or significantly change it. If this happens, the revenue raised by the bill and the tax fairness it promotes are in serious jeopardy.

 

We need the bill sponsors and the members of HTRC to hear just as loudly from supporters of the bill as those that want to maintain the status quo. Rep. Javier Martinez, HTRC Chair Jim Trujillo, and Speaker Brian Egolf are the most important members to contact.

 

Here are some revenue talking points, but the key messages to get to legislators are to let them know you support HB 6 and remind them that:

  1. Raising at least $300m in new, stable, and sustainable revenue will help us get off the boom-to-bust oil and gas cycle and ensure we can achieve an education moonshot.
  2. We need to restore fairness and progressivity in our tax code to help New Mexico’s families.

 

Members are listed here:

 

Please elevate this issue on social media too! Graphics and posts for social media can be found here. We’ll also be doing a push on Facebook, Twitter, and through some other venues, so please share our NMVC and personal content as well!

 

Legislative Update, Monday February 25, 2019

SB22 (Senator Michael Padilla and Representative Linda M. Trujillo) the bill to create a new early childhood department, passed out of Senate Education Committee with bipartisan support on Monday! Importantly, the bill was amended, again with bipartisan support, to ensure that private pre-K at the new department and public pre-K at PED is jointly administered, ensuring that PED will remain an equal partner in pre-K administration and delivery with the Local School Districts who run those programs now funded through it. With this amendment, NEA-NM supports SB22.

We support the motivations behind SB22 to consolidate programs serving children 0-5 within one department. Our concern has been that this consolidation would disrupt public pre-K, a program that is working well in the public schools already. Private sector providers, whose business the new Early Childhood Department would serve, will try to remove the Amendment in Senate Finance Committee.  Please contact Senate Finance Committee members to ask they support SB 22 only with the Senate Education Committee Amendment retained. 

First

Last

Phone

Email

Bill

Burt

(505) 986-4366

bill.burt@nmlegis.gov

Pete

Campos

(505) 986-4311

pete.campos@nmlegis.gov

Jacob

Candelaria

(505) 986-4380

jacob.candelaria@nmlegis.gov

Carlos

Cisneros

(505) 986-4362

carlos.cisneros@nmlegis.gov

Gay

Kernan

(505) 986-4274

gay.kernan@nmlegis.gov

George

Munoz

(505) 986-4371

senatormunoz@gmail.com

Stephen

Neville

(505) 986-4701

steven.neville@nmlegis.gov

Nancy

Rodriguez

(505) 986-4264

nancy.rodriguez@nmlegis.gov

Sander

Rue

(505) 986-4375

sander.rue@nmlegis.gov

John

Sapien

(505) 986-4301

john.sapien@nmlegis.gov

John Arthur

Smith

(505) 986-4365

john.smith@nmlegis.gov

James

White

(505) 986-4395

james.white@nmlegis.gov

 

SB 183 will provide immediate relief for most teachers and nearly all other education employees, as well as most of the families of our students! The Working Families Tax Credit Increase passed Senate Corporations Committee on a UNANIMOUS VOTE! 

 

Eligibility for both credits depend on a filer’s earned income, marital status, and the number of dependent children. For tax year 2015, working parents

 

who had incomes of up to $39,131 (for a single parent with one child) and $53,267 (for a married couple with three or more children) could receive the credits.
Workers with no children had to earn no more than $14,820 (or $20,330, if married and filing jointly) to qualify for credits.
The value of the refunds ranged between maximums of $503 (with no children) and $6,242 (with three or more children) for the EITC and $50 to $620 for the WFTC.

 

Please thank Sponsor Gerald Ortiz y Pino, and urge members of Senate Finance Committee (see table above) to also pass the bill.

 

Legislative Update, Wednesday, February 20

As the legislature moves into its second half, the pace picks up.  We have a rather long update today, but there is a lot going on.  So here goes:

 

Several positive measures advanced in the House Education Committee this morning.

Several pieces of legislation received do-pass recommendations in the House Education Committee this morning.  NEA New Mexico supported HB 434 CHARTER SCHOOL AUTHORIZATION MORATORIUM, which would place a three year moratorium on new charter schools.  We also supported HB 25 TEACHING PATHWAYS COORDINATOR; this measure creates a staff position in the Public Education Department to help coordinate future teachers pathways into the profession.  We supported HB 554 SCHOOL BUS AIR CONDITIONING & SEATBELTS requiring that all new school buses purchased be equipped with air conditioners and seatbelts.  Two memorials also passed, one, HM 40 would study the idea of providing paid residency programs in teacher preparation and the other HM 45 would study ways to reintroduce civics education into the curriculum.

 

Bill to implement culturally and linguistically appropriate approaches to literacy and bi-literacy advances.

Congratulate and thank  Representative Tomás E. Salazar on the passage by the House of Representatives of HB 182 which mandates culturally and linguistically relevant comprehensive literacy and bi-literacy instruction for all New Mexico students. The bill requires PED to develop a long-term plan for improving and sustaining literacy and bi-literacy programs and requires the PED to work with school districts and communities to design a literacy and bi-literacy initiative that is culturally and linguistically relevant. This bill would move the State toward compliance with the Yazzie/Martinez court order. 

 

The initiative would include informative assessment and evaluation of student literacy and bi-literacy levels, appropriate professional development to assist staff in the instruction of literacy and bi-literacy, extra time in the student’s day or year for implementation of literacy and biliteracy programs, and criteria for public schools to establish individualized plans for students who fail to meet grade level literacy and bi-literacy proficiency standards.

 

House Bill (HB) 23/SB 183 Working Families Tax Credit advances

HB 23, the Working Families Tax Credit bill, introduced by Representative (Union educator) Natalie Figueroa was “temporarily tabled” today by House Taxation and Revenue Committee.  Temporary tabling is an action House Tax and Revenue Committee takes on all bills to be kept under consideration until the Committee can look at all the proposals comprehensively, and to then make decisions about which to pass onto the House as a whole. Please thank Representative Natalie Figueroa: (505) 986-4255 or natalie.figueroa@nmlegis.gov.    

 

HB 23 is a “mirror bill” of Senate Bill 183. Please also thank the Senate Sponsor Gerald Ortiz y Pino (contact information available via the link).  

Ninety-six percent (96%) of the money from the credit goes to families with children – i.e. students. 225,000 students will benefit – 44% of all NM children.

Of all the factors outside of the control of teachers, poverty is the largest impact on educational attainment – i.e. student success.  Poverty places families and their children into states of stress – usually ongoing stresses.    Student bring the impact of those home stresses with them to school.  That’s why countless academic research efforts prove student test scores and graduation rates improve as income-related family stresses are reduced.

Many school employees benefit from this HB 23 directly too.  Custodians, cooks, secretaries, Education Assistants – all of whom contribute enormously to student success will all benefit. A top WFTC level is $54,884 for a family with 3 or more children.  The average teacher pay in NM is approximately ten thousand dollars less than that level.  Even with higher pay – this will still help most educators.

The benefits of this bill are important on so many levels for both our students and for our members too.

Other important revenue bills still moving and in need of support include: 

 

The House Taxation & Revenue Committee is the first stop for revenue bills.  Let them know of our need for them to support student success with diverse, sustainable revenues to fuel the rocket flights for the Education Moonshot. 

 

At least $300 million in new revenue must be raised to sustain the so-called “Education Moonshot,” therefore all the following measures must be passed (separately or via a “comprehensive” or “omnibus” tax bill)!

 

  • Raise the Personal Income Tax rate on the highest income New Mexicans (only) in HB 6 Jim R. Trujillo et.al.  HB 6 will be heard in the committee this Wednesday.
  • Level the playing field between local New Mexico businesses and the big international corporations by eliminating the sales tax exemption on internet sales (SB 6, Senate Leader Peter Wirth), and also by…
  • Eliminating a tax loophole through a policy known as “combined reporting” (SB 335, Senate Leader Peter Wirth and Representative Melanie A. Stansbury, sponsors)
  • Motor Vehicle Excise Fee increases.

 

Even if you don’t mention all the specifics, please encourage the legislators to support proposals to raise at least $300 million in new revenue! House Taxation and Revenue Committee members (Click for phone and email contact information):

 

Chair Jim R. Trujillo, Javier Martínez, Abbas Akhil, Christine Chandler, Brian Golf, Doreen Y. Gallegos, Jason C. Harper, Susan K. Herrera, Tim D. Lewis, Antonio Maestas, Rod Montoya, Larry R. Scott,  James R.J. Strickler

 

House and Senate Leaders also need to be “on-board” so contacting them is also very useful. House Speaker Brian Egolf, and House Majority Whip Doreen Y. Gallegos are both leaders and also on the Tax and Revenue Committee.  House Majority Leader Sheryl Williams Stapleton, and House Caucus Chair Doreen Y. Gallegos should also be asked for their support for all these measures.

 

Community schools bill gets its first hearing Friday morning in the House Education Committee.

 

HB 589 is scheduled for hearing in the House Education Committee this Friday, in room 309 at 8:30am.  It amends the Community Schools Act to modernize the language, supporting community school development throughout the state.  HB 589 updates requirements to ensure that community schools have the needed capacity to successfully create and maintain partnerships.  HB 589 is sponsored by Representative Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson, an education professional (PT), also a Union member.

 

  • The community school framework is a key delivery mechanism to ensure “at-risk” students specifically identified in the Yazzie/Martinez ruling get the supports and services that they need both in and out of the classroom.
  • HB589 creates needed alignment with the current evidence base of highly effective community schools as well as a clear understanding of the framework.
  • Specifically attaching funding to HB589 ensures a strategy that will integrate community and school-based supports and services to help students and families succeed. 

 

Phone or email the Representatives listed below with this message:

 

“I am ____________ and my zip code is  __________, I am calling to urge you to support HB 589 in support of Community Schools in New Mexico.  Please support the appropriation of $5.1 million to fund community school development across our state. Thank you.”

 

 

 

REP. NAME

DIST

PARTY

COUNTY

PHONE (CAPITOL)

EMAIL

G. Andrés Romero CHAIR

10

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4846

andres.romero@nmlegis.gov

Linda M. Trujillo

48

D

Santa Fe

(505) 986-4436

linda.trujillo@nmlegis.gov

Alonzo Baldonado

8

R

Valencia

(505) 986-4243

alonzo.baldonado@nmlegis.gov

Jack Chatfield

67

R

Colfax, Curry, Harding, Quay, Roosevelt, San Miguel and Union

(505) 986-4467

jackc@plateautel.net

Rebecca Dow

38

R

Grant, Hidalgo & Sierra

(505) 986-4453

rebecca.dow@nmlegis.gov

Natalie Figueroa

30

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4255

natalie.figueroa@nmlegis.gov

David M. Gallegos

61

R

Lea

(505) 986-4454

david.rsi@hotmail.com

Joy Garratt

29

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4249

joy.garratt@nmlegis.gov

Raymundo Lara

34

D

Dona Ana

(505) 986-4254

 raymundo.lara@nmlegis.gov

Willie D. Madrid

53

D

Dona Ana & Otero

(505) 986-4436

willie.madrid@nmlegis.gov

Tomás E. Salazar

70

D

San Miguel, Santa Fe and Torrance

(505) 986-4236

tomas.salazar@nmlegis.gov

Debra M. Sariñana

21

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4227

debbie.sarinana@nmlegis.gov

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

19

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4780

sheryl.stapleton@nmlegis.gov

Christine Trujillo

25

D

Bernalillo

(505) 986-4435

christine.trujillo@nmlegis.gov

 

 

Legislative Update, Tuesday, February 19, 2019

 

The following bills will be heard in the House Education Committee tomorrow morning.  Our support is indicated below.   Follow the links to read the bills.  HB 424 temporarily limits the number of charter schools by placing a moratorium on new charters until 2022. HB 25 creates a position in the PED to coordinate different pathways to teaching to help overcome the teacher shortage.  The two memorials ask for studies of important issues.

 

HB 434

CHARTER SCHOOL AUTHORIZATION MORATORIUM- Support

C Trujillo

HB 480

GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION EXPANSION GRANTS

DY Gallegos

HB 7

HIGHER EDUCATION CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE

Cadena

HB 25

TEACHING PATHWAYS COORDINATOR- Support

Bash

HB 554

SCHOOL BUS AIR CONDITIONING & SEATBELTS

Brown

HM 40

STUDY PAID TEACHER RESIDENCY PROGRAMS-Support

Figueroa

HM 45

REVIEW CIVICS EDUCATION-Support

L Trujillo

 

 The House taxation and revenue committee will have two very critical pieces of legislation tomorrow morning.

 

HB 23 INCREASE WORKING FAMILIES TAX CREDIT (FIGUEROA/MADRID)

 

HB 6 TAX CHANGES (TRUJILLO J/STAPLETON)’

 

House bill 23 increases the Working Families tax credit (WFTC) from 10 percent of the corresponding federal earned income tax credit (EITC) to 20 percent of federal EITC. The purpose of this bill is to return money to certain low- to moderate income working family taxpayers to make up for an estimated $55 million increase in state personal income taxes caused because the state did not adjust to the federal Tax Change and Jobs Act of 2016 (TCJA).

 

The House Taxation & Revenue Committee is putting together a comprehensive tax package, so it’s a great time for the public to let them know of your request that they support student success with diverse, sustainable revenues to fuel the rocket flights for the Education Moon shot.  There can be no true Education Transformation without the revenue to sustain it! /t

 

That tax package will be in a substitute for HB 6 in the committee tomorrow.

 

At least $300 million in new revenue must be raised to sustain the so-called “Education Moon shot,” While tomorrow’s measure may be a good start, we fear that more revenue will be needed.  Urge committee members to create sustainable revenues for public schools.

 

The new leadership of the Public Education Department is seeking your input. 

 

Even though this is not Legislative News, it will impact future legislation.  The New Mexico Public Education Department Seeks Feedback on potential amendments to the state’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan, created under Governor Martinez and Secretary Skandera.  NEA-New Mexico urges you to please send a quick comment of support!

 

Please read through the updates and then fill out the survey to share your opinion on the proposed changes to New Mexico’s education plan, to recommend additional improvements to New Mexico’s education plan, or to express support for the new accountability framework proposed in the amendments. The deadline for public comment is February 28, 2019.

 

The new leadership of the New Mexico Public Education Department is in place because of the hard work NEA-New Mexico members engaged in last fall to replace the old administration.   The new leadership of the P.E.D. believes that every student has the ability to succeed in their future college, career or civic endeavors and that every New Mexico school has the potential to prepare them to do so. In compliance with the Every Student Succeeds Act for allocating federal grant money to schools in need, the department is proposing to replace the existing A-F school grading system with designations that shift the philosophy from identifying schools as “failing” to providing support for schools in need, and celebrating success.

 

The amendments to New Mexico’s ESSA plan also plan to remove the PARCC assessment, Value Added Modeling, and school closure provisions as a model of more rigorous interventions. Instead of school closure, the NM PED will provide critical resources and partner with schools, tribes and districts to significantly restructure and redesign the school with intensive support for curricular, instructional, and pedagogical practices, as well as pairing schools with evidence-based interventions such as community schools models.

 

Amendments require a public comment period, so comment now and please distribute to any interested parties that may wish to either offer support for the changes or feedback for improvement.  

 

Legislative Update, Monday, February 18, 2019

 

LOOKING GOOD FOR SCHOOL EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION: 

 

The House Appropriations and Finance Committee has approved their House Bill (HB) 2, the famous comprehensive budget bill.  With this bill, the legislature is moving to match the Governor’s budget proposal for a six percent across the board pay raise for all school employees, including teachers who might have received less than that amount as they move a licensure level this coming year. HB 2 also provides new higher licensure level minimums of $41,000, $50,000 and $60,000 for Levels I, II, and III respectively. 

 

FUELING THE “EDUCATION MOONSHOT” REQUIRES REVENUE TO SUSTAIN US ON THE TRIP!

 

The legislature has produced mixed results so far in terms of raising sufficient stable revenue to sustain the “Education Transformation” or “Moonshot.” 

 

NEA-New Mexico shares the Land Commissioner’s disappointment in legislators who voted against House Bill 398 in the House Commerce & Economic Development Committee. “The bill in itself was crafted to allow [the land commissioner] to do her job to the fullest extent — generate funds for education,” Lente said after the committee hearing.

 

Together with allied pro-public education groups, fellow unions, conservation and environmental groups, our members worked so hard to help gain a large majority for their caucus. Please thank Rep. Derrick J. Lente for sponsoring the bill.  (505) 986-4341: derrick.lente@nmlegis.gov.  

 

Please share your deep disappointment in the following legislators, and your expectation they will support ALL other bills to increase revenue to sustain the “Education Moonshot” they reportedly support. Rep. Moe Maestas (505) 986-4333: antonio.maestas@nmlegis.gov 

 

Rep. Patricio Ruiloba (505) 986-4327: patricio.ruiloba@nmlegis.gov 

 

Rep. Jim Trujillo (505) 986-4420: jimtrujillo@msn.com 

 

Other important revenue bills still moving and in need of support include: 

 

The House Taxation & Revenue Committee is the first stop for revenue bills.  Let them know of our need for them to support student success with diverse, sustainable revenues to fuel the rocket flights for the Education Moonshot. 

 

At least $300 million in new revenue must be raised to sustain the so-called “Education Moonshot,” therefore all the following measures must be passed (separately or via a “comprehensive” or “omnibus” tax bill)!

 

  •   Raise the Personal Income Tax rate on the highest income New Mexicans (only) in HB 6 Rep. Jim R. Trujillo et.al.  HB 6 will be heard in the committee this Wednesday.
  •   Level the playing field between local New Mexico businesses and the big international corporations by eliminating the sales tax exemption on internet sales (SB 6, Senate Leader Peter Wirth), and also by…
  •   Eliminating a tax loophole through a policy known as “combined reporting” (SB 335, Senate Leader Peter Wirth and Representative Melanie A. Stansbury, sponsors)
  •   Motor Vehicle Excise Fee increases.

 

Even if you don’t mention all the specifics, please encourage the legislators to support proposals to raise at least $300 million in new revenue! House Taxation and Revenue Committee members (Click for phone and email contact information):

 

Chair Jim R. Trujillo, Javier Martinez, Abbas Akhil, Christine Chandler, Brian Egolf, Doreen Y. Gallegos, Jason C. Harper, Susan K. Herrera, Tim D. Lewis, Antonio Maestas, Rod Montoya, Larry R. Scott,  James R.J. Strickler.

 

House and Senate Leaders also need to be “on-board” so contacting them is also very useful. House Speaker Brian Egolf, and House Majority Whip Doreen Y. Gallegos are both leaders and also on the Tax and Revenue Committee.  House Majority Leader Sheryl Williams Stapleton, and House Caucus Chair Doreen Y. Gallegos should also be asked for their support for all these measures.   Then, we will all need to encourage the Governor to sign the bill(s) when they get to her desk. 

 

MORE PAY, BUT LESS TAKE HOME PAY?  HB511 WILL HELP OUR LOWER PAID COLLEAGUES! 

 

HB511 would increase take-home pay for many low-paid public school employees.  Under current law, school districts and charter schools are required to pay a minimum percentage of total health insurance premiums, ranging from 75 percent of the total premium to 60 percent of the total premium.  HB511 would increase the salary level for which employers would be required to pay a higher share of the premium.  Last year, an EA in Las Cruces took home 7.3% less pay after receiving an increase above 4%.  Please contact House Education Committee members to express your support for HB 511 to fix this problem, which will be heard in their committee Wednesday morning. 

 

Please send an email of support for HB511 to House Education Committee members: 

 

andres.romero@nmlegis.gov; linda.trujillo@nmlegis.gov; alonzo.baldonado@nmlegis.govjackc@plateautel.net; rebecca.dow@nmlegis.gov; natalie.figueroa@nmlegis.govdavid.rsi@hotmail.com; joy.garratt@nmlegis.gov; raymundo.lara@nmlegis.gov; willie.madrid@nmlegis.gov; tomas.salazar@nmlegis.gov; debbie.sarinana@nmlegis.gov; sheryl.stapleton@nmlegis.gov; christine.trujillo@nmlegis.gov;  

 

 

Legislative Update, Wednesday February 13, 2019

 

Today: 

 

The following measures received do-pass recommendations from the House Education Committee this morning and will move to the House Appropriations and Finance Committee (HAFC)  for their next hearing.  While most observers recognize the value of this set of bills, they can only be implemented if the legislature provides the necessary funding.  Ask members of the HAFC to fund these important initiatives.

 

HB 47

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE & ASSISTANTS PROBATION TIME

Roybal Caballero

HB 394

CULTURAL & LINGUISTIC APPROPRIATE EDUCATION

Salazar

HB 397

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE MINIMUM SALARIES

L Trujillo

HB 400

SCHOOL MEDIA LITERACY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Maestas

HB 121

SOCIAL SERVICES AS BASIC SUFFICIENT EDUCATION

Roybal Caballero

 

HB 47 will reduce the probationary period of classified school employees from three years to one year.

 

HB 397 will provide a $12.00 dollar an hour minimum wage for school employees. 

 

Both House bills 394 and 400 help implement the recent Yazzi/Martinez Court Ruling to provide a linguistic and culturally appropriate education for all New Mexico students.  House Bill 121 makes nursing, school counseling, and behavioral health services a part of a basic sufficient education. The bill requires school districts and charter schools to develop annual plans to offer all students access to these services that are culturally and linguistically relevant to their student population. The bill further requires PED to develop rules, create monitoring processes, hire social service experts, provide technical assistance, and ensure funding is used to provide these services to all students.

 

Tomorrow:

 

Tomorrow   2:30 in room 321,  Senate bill 247 dealing with teacher evaluation will be heard  in the Senate Public Affairs Committee.  This measure sponsored by Senator Mimi Stewart is supported by NEA-NM as the best vehicle to create an effective teacher evaluation system with stakeholder collaboration and school district flexibility.  The teacher evaluation system currently in use is the Martinez/Skandera/Ruszkowski NM Teach. However, the system is being challenged by two lawsuits. Due to a 2015 court injunction, PED has not been able to use the teacher evaluations to inform employment, advancement, or licensure decisions. Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham has issued Executive Order 2019-002, directing PED to develop a new teacher evaluation system. Currently all teachers receive summative evaluations every year. SB 247 changes summative evaluations to every three years for experience teachers with a rating of either proficient or distinguished. Summative evaluations are to include four components: instructional quality, student feedback, student learning growth, professional responsibility and development. Instructional quality shall count for at least 50 percent of a teacher’s summative rating.  Senate bill 247Senate bill 247 is the mechanism to get this process moving.

 

 

Legislative Update, Tuesday, February 12, 2019

 

Today: This afternoon, so called right-to-work legislation returned to the legislative agenda for a short-lived moment in the sun in the House Labor, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee.  The measure, House Bill 378, misnamed Employee Preference Act would do away with fail share clauses in private sector union agreements.  This  “right-to-work for less” legislation and had nothing to do with protecting employee rights. After a long series of speakers, mostly against,  the measure was tabled on a party-line vote.  The same fate befell another anti-labor bill,  House Bill 377, which would have repealed the statute requiring workers on New Mexico publicly financed projects be paid at least at the prevailing wage rate for other workers in the same job.

 

Tomorrow: Several important bills will be on the House Education Committee Agenda tomorrow morning. NEA-New Mexico supports the following: 

 

HB 47

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE & ASSISTANTS PROBATION TIME

Roybal Caballero

HB 394

CULTURAL & LINGUISTIC APPROPRIATE EDUCATION

Salazar

HB 397

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE MINIMUM SALARIES

L Trujillo

HB 400

SCHOOL MEDIA LITERACY ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Maestas

HB 121

SOCIAL SERVICES AS BASIC SUFFICIENT EDUCATION

Roybal Caballero

 

HB 47 will reduce the probationary period of classified school employees from three years to one year.

 

HB 397 will provide a $12.00 dollar an hour minimum wage for school employees. 

 

Both House bills 394 and 400 help implement the recent Yazzie/Martinez Court Ruling to provide a linguistic and culturally appropriate education for all New Mexico students.  House Bill 121 makes nursing, school counseling, and behavioral health services a part of a basic sufficient education. The bill requires school districts and charter schools to develop annual plans to offer all students access to these services that are culturally and linguistically relevant to their student population. The bill further requires PED to develop rules, create monitoring processes, hire social service experts, provide technical assistance, and ensure funding is used to provide these services to all students.

 

 

 

Legislative Update, Monday, February 11, 2019

 

Critics say there is simply not enough money (in this year with a budget surplus of about $1 billion) to sufficiently fund the schools to support a true Education Transformation.  We disagree, but we do agree with all who say new and stable revenue is needed to be sure the valuable initiatives included in their budgets are sustainable in future years. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The House Taxation & Revenue Committee is putting together a comprehensive tax package, so it’s a great time for the public to let them know of your request that they support student success with diverse, sustainable revenues to fuel the rocket flights for the Education Moonshot.  There can be no true Education Transformation without the revenue to sustain it!

At least $300 million in new revenue must be raised to sustain the so-called “Education Moonshot,” therefore all the following measures must be passed (separately or via a “comprehensive” or “omnibus” tax bill)!

·       On the wealthiest New Mexicans, raise the Personal Income Tax (HB 365 Miguel P. Garcia, sponsor and HB 335Daymon Ely, sponsor and SB 98, Senator Bill B. O’Neill, sponsor).

·       Level the playing field between local New Mexico businesses and the big international corporations that more and more dominate our economy by eliminating the sales tax exemption on internet sales (SB 6, Senate Leader Peter Wirth), and also by…

·       eliminating a tax loophole through a policy known as “combined reporting” (SB 335, Senate Leader Peter Wirth and Representative Melanie A. Stansbury, sponsors)

·       Motor Vehicle Excise Fee increases.

House Taxation and Revenue Committee members (Click for phone and email contact information):

Even if you don’t mention all the specifics, please encourage the legislators to support proposals to raise at least $300 million in new revenue!

Chair Jim R. TrujilloJavier MartínezAbbas AkhilChristine ChandlerBrian EgolfDoreen Y. GallegosJason C. Harper,Susan K. HerreraTim D. LewisAntonio MaestasRod MontoyaLarry R. Scott,  James R.J. Strickler.

House and Senate Leaders also need to be “on-board” so contacting them is also very useful. House Speaker Brian Egolf, and House Majority Whip Doreen Y. Gallegos are both leaders and also on the Tax and Revenue Committee. House Majority Leader Sheryl Williams Stapleton, and House Caucus Chair Doreen Y. Gallegos should also be asked for their support for all these measures.

Senate leadership to urge their support for all the revenue measures: Senate President Pro-TemporeMary Kay Papen, Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth, and Senate Whip Mimi Stewart.

NEA-New Mexico does support HB 18 (Sponsors: Micaela Lara Cadena and Christine Chandler),  though it would reduce state revenue.  It is targeted to support working families who send their children to our schools, and poverty has a direct impact on the success of students.  This bill would nullify the impact on our state tax policies of the Trump tax give aware to the rich which forced that tax increase on working New Mexico families.  The Trump tax give away to the rich stuck New Mexico’s working families with children with a tax increase of $50 million!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legislative Update Thursday, February 7, 2019

 

We’ve been promised a moonshot for education!  The Rockets [proposed budgets] Built for the Education Moonshot need Fuel [sufficient, diverse and sustainable revenue] to Power the Flight All the Way to the Moon.”

 

Therefore, today’s legislative update focuses on revenue bills.  

 

Already one important revenue bill went down to defeat (in a Democrat-led Committee), so we need a great deal of support for the others mentioned below.   Please thank Representative Chandler ((505) 986-4226,  Christine.Chandler@nnmlegis.gov for presenting the bill to raise the corporate income tax to an unfriendly committee).  HB 247 was tabled by House Commerce and Economic Development Committee.

 

House Taxation & Revenue Committee is putting together a comprehensive tax package now, so it’s a great time to let them (and legislative leaders whose contact info. is also below) know of public education’s need for diverse, sustainable revenues to fuel the rocket flights for the Education Moonshot.  There can be no true Education Transformation without the revenue to sustain it!

 

At least $300 million in new revenue must be raised to sustain the so-called “Education Moonshot,” therefore all the following measures must be passed (separately or via a “comprehensive” or “omnibus” tax bill)!

 

  • On the wealthiest New Mexicans only, raise the Personal Income Tax (HB 365 Miguel P. Garcia, sponsor and HB 335, Daymon Ely, sponsor and SB 98, Senator Bill B. O’Neill, sponsor).
  • Level the playing field between local New Mexico businesses and the big international corporations that more and more dominate our economy by eliminating the sales tax exemption on internet sales (SB 6, Senate Leader Peter Wirth), and also by…
  • eliminating a tax loophole through a policy known as “combined reporting” (SB 335, Senate Leader Peter Wirth and Representative Melanie A. Stansbury, sponsors)
  • Motor Vehicle Excise Fee increases.

 

If you don’t want to talk about individual bills, the short message is, “We need at least $300 million new dollars to have any hope of a sustainable revenue for future public education increases!”

 

House Taxation and Revenue Committee members (Click for phone and email contact information):

 

Chair Jim R. Trujillo, Javier Martínez, Abbas Akhil, Christine Chandler, Brian Egolf, Doreen Y. Gallegos, Jason C. Harper, Susan K. Herrera, Tim D. Lewis, Antonio Maestas, Rod Montoya, Larry R. Scott,  James R.J. Strickler.

 

 

 

House and Senate Leaders also need to be “on-board” so contacting them is also very useful. House Speaker Brian Egolf, and House Majority Whip Doreen Y. Gallegos are both leaders and also on the Tax and Revenue Committee.  House Majority Leader Sheryl Williams Stapleton, and House Caucus Chair Doreen Y. Gallegos should also be asked for their support for all these measures.

 

 

 

Senate leadership to urge their support for all the revenue measures: Senate President Pro-Tempore Mary Kay Papen, Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth, and Senate Whip Mimi Stewart.

 

 

 

We do support HB 18 (Sponsors: Micaela Lara Cadena and Christine Chandler)  though it would actually reduce state revenue.  It is targeted to support working families who send their children to our schools, and poverty has a direct impact on the success of students, we support the Child Income Tax Credit.  This bill would nullify the impact on our state tax policies of the Trump tax give aware to the rich which forced that tax increase on working New Mexico families.  The Trump tax give away to the rich stuck New Mexico’s working families with children with a tax increase of $50 million!

 

 

Legislative Update for Wednesday, February 6

 

Two proposals to strengthen educator retirement passed their first House committee today, the House State Government, Elections & Indian Affairs Committee.  House Bill 95 amends the Retiree Health Care Act by increasing employee and employer contributions beginning in FY20. The bill increases employer contributions from the state, local governments, public schools and certain universities from 2 percent to 2.5 percent in FY20 and from 2.5 percent to 3 percent in FY21. The bill increases employee contributions from 1 percent to 1.25 percent in FY22 and from 1.25 percent to 1.5 percent in FY23.  Total contributions to the fund will increase from 3 percent to 4.5 percent of payroll by FY23. While increasing contributions is a hard decision, the new contributions for employees are not until 2022.  The changes to educational retirement change benefits for future employees, but not for current employees or retirees.

 

We support both measures as necessary to preserve retirement benefits into the future,  Both now move to the  House Appropriations and Finance Committee.

 

HB 95

RETIREE HEALTH CARE FUND CONTRIBUTIONS

Salazar

HB 360/a

EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES

Salazar

 

 

 

Below is a nearly complete list of the bills we are following and our position:

 

 

HB 2

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 2019

Patricia A. Lundstrom

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

 

HB 5

PUBLIC EDUCATION CHANGES

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Patricia A. Lundstrom

Christine Trujillo

G. Andres Romero

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support with amendments to increase spending

 

HB 6

TAX CHANGES

Jim R. Trujillo
Sheryl Williams Stapleton

Javier Martínez

Susan K. Herrera

Antonio “Moe” Maestas

HOUSE TAXATION & REVENUE 

Oppose as written.  A substitute is being created.

 

HB 20

GROW YOUR OWN TEACHERS ACT

Joy Garratt
Michael Padilla

Christine Trujillo

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 31

PHASED-IN MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE

Miguel P. Garcia
Joanne J. Ferrary

House Temporary Calendar

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 39

NATIVE NEW MEXICAN TEACHER INCENTIVE PAY ACT

Miguel P. Garcia

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Oppose while tied to old Teacher Evaluation system

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 42

TEACHER INCENTIVE PAY IN FREE LUNCH SCHOOLS

Miguel P. Garcia

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Oppose while tied to old Teacher Evaluation system

 

HB 44

CAREER-TECHNICAL TEACHER DEVELOPMENT

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Melanie A. Stansbury

Anthony Allison

Chaptered

Support

 

HB 45

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL DEFINITIONS & FUNDING

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

Senate Education 

Support

 

HB 46

INCREASE MINIMUM WAGE

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE COMMERCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Support

 

HB 47

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE & ASSISTANTS PROBATION TIME

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support if amended

 

HB 71

SCHOOL-BASED HEALTH CENTER FUNDING

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 72

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SCOPE OF PRACTICE

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

Chaptered

Support

 

*HB 77

SCHOOL DISTRICT ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales
Jacob Candelaria

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Oppose- concept is good, wording too vague and budget has increased PED supervision of district finances

 

HB 79

COMMUNITY SCHOOLS ACT IMPLEMENTATION

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support – blend with HB 134

 

 

HB 80

SEXUAL ASSAULT SERVICES FUNDING

Dayan Hochman-Vigil
Joanne J. Ferrary

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 91

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION PILOT PROJECT

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Dayan Hochman-Vigil

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 92

LIMIT SCHOOL TESTING TIME

Joanne J. Ferrary

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 95

RETIREE HEALTH CARE FUND CONTRIBUTIONS

Tomás E. Salazar
Elizabeth “Liz” Stefanics

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Support

 

HB 111

CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC EDUCATION SUPPORT

Tomás E. Salazar
Linda M. Trujillo

Derrick J. Lente

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 114

NM TECH SUPERCOMPUTING CHALLENGE PROGRAM

Kelly K. Fajardo

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 120

BILINGUAL TEACHER PREPARATION ACT

Tomás E. Salazar
Christine Trujillo

Joy Garratt

Derrick J. Lente

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 121

SOCIAL SERVICES AS BASIC SUFFICIENT EDUCATION

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 122

INCLUDE HOMELESS IN HATE CRIMES

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE CONSUMER & PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Support

 

HB 125

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE SCHOOL PROGRAMS

Candie G. Sweetser

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 127

COLLEGE AFFORDABILITY ACT CHANGES

G. Andres Romero

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 129

SCHOOL SECURITY PERSONNEL & DEADLY WEAPONS

Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

HB 132

REMOVE TOBACCO FUND AS RESERVE FUND

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE CONSUMER & PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Support

 

HB 133

SCHOOL SEXUAL ACTIVITY CONSENT STANDARDS

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 134

PRE-K IN COMMUNITY SCHOOLS ACT

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Support

 

HB 144

SCHOOL BRAIN EDUCATION PROGRAM

Christine Trujillo
Linda M. Lopez

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 145

AFTER-SCHOOL & SUMMER ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS

Christine Trujillo
Bill Tallman

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 146

FULL LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIP BASED ON NEED

Debra M. Sariñana

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Support

 

HB 148

ROBOT PLAYSHOPS & COMPETITION

Christine Trujillo

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 152

EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN IN FOSTER CARE

Patricio Ruiloba

HOUSE HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Support

 

HB 153

EMPLOYEE SUICIDE IDENTIFICATION TRAINING

Patricio Ruiloba

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

HB 154

LAW ENFORCEMENT PROTECTION FUND DISTRIBUTION

Antonio “Moe” Maestas
Natalie Figueroa

Melanie A. Stansbury

William “Bill” R. Rehm

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 159

MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION FRAMEWORK

Tomás E. Salazar
Christine Trujillo

Derrick J. Lente

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 168

STUDENT ID NUMBER TRACKING & REPORTING

Linda M. Trujillo
Elizabeth “Liz” Stefanics

Andrea Romero

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 170

EXPAND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL DEFINITION

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 171

RAISING MINIMUM TEACHER SALARIES

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support without additional days

 

HB 172

STUDENT LOAN BILL OF RIGHTS ACT

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE COMMERCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Support

 

HB 173

CHILD & FAMILY DATABANK ACT

Antonio “Moe” Maestas

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 181

CONVERSION CHARTER SCHOOL STUDENT PREFERENCE

Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE LOCAL GOVERNMENT, LAND GRANTS & CULTURAL AFFAIRS

Support

 

HB 182

READING INITIATIVE LITERACY & BILITERACY

Linda M. Trujillo
Tomás E. Salazar

Derrick J. Lente

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 183

APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM FOR GRADUATION

Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE LABOR, VETERANS’ AND MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 196

PREGNANT WORKER ACCOMMODATION ACT

Gail Chasey

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

HB 197

EARLY CHILDHOOD SHARED SERVICE INTEGRATION

Rebecca Dow

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Oppose ??

 

HB 199

NM TECH CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB

Jason C. Harper

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*HB 212

TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL EVALUATION ACT

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

??

 

HB 215

LOW-INCOME, AT-RISK CHILDREN DANCE PROGRAM

Linda M. Trujillo
Andrea Romero

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 227

USE OF TEACHER ATTENDANCE FOR EVALUATIONS

Jason C. Harper
Andrea Romero

Christine Chandler

Chaptered

Support

 

HB 230

DUTY TO REPORT CHILD ABUSE

Christine Trujillo

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 235

COUNSELING & THERAPY ACT DEFINITIONS

D. Wonda Johnson
Tomás E. Salazar

HOUSE COMMERCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Support

 

HB 236

ATTENDANCE FOR SUCCESS ACT

Patricio Ruiloba

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support w modification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 238

CHILDHOOD TRAUMA AWARENESS TRAINING ACT

Patricio Ruiloba

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 239

CHILDREN’S SAVINGS ACCOUNT ACT

G. Andres Romero

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 240

ALTERNATIVE LEVEL 1 TEACHER PATH TO LEVEL 2

G. Andres Romero

House Calendar

Support

 

HB 243

INSTRUCTION FOR DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

Dayan Hochman-Vigil

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 250

NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENT NEEDS ASSESSMENTS

Derrick J. Lente

Chaptered

Support

 

 

 

 

HB 264

PAID FAMILY MEDICAL LEAVE ACT

Christine Chandler

HOUSE COMMERCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 

Support

 

HB 265

SEAT BELTS IN SCHOOL BUSES

Jack Chatfield
William “Bill” R. Rehm

Christine Trujillo

Susan K. Herrera

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Oppose

 

HB 274

DIAL-A-TEACHER PROGRAM LICENSE PLATES

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

HOUSE TRANSPORTATION, PUBLIC WORKS & CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Support

 

HB 275

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AFFORDABILITY

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Debra M. Sariñana

Raymundo Lara

Joanne J. Ferrary

Natalie Figueroa

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 295

HEALTH SECURITY ACT

Deborah A. Armstrong
Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales

Gail Chasey

Patricia Roybal Caballero

Joanne J. Ferrary

HOUSE HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES

Support

 

HB 313

COMMUNITY COLLEGE & TECH SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID

Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS & FINANCE 

Support

 

HB 318

WORKFORCE SOFT SKILLS PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Christine Trujillo

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 321

CAR REGISTRATION FEE FOR ROAD FUND

Jim R. Trujillo
Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales

Rodolpho “Rudy” S. Martinez

HOUSE TRANSPORTATION, PUBLIC WORKS & CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Support

 

HB 322

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER COVERAGE

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson
Karen C. Bash

Natalie Figueroa

HOUSE CONSUMER & PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*HB 328

NM-GROWN PRODUCE FOR SCHOOL MEALS

Paul C. Bandy
Nathan P. Small

HOUSE AGRICULTURE & WATER RESOURCES 

Support

 

HB 330

TRAINING LAW ENFORCEMENT FOR SCHOOL RESOURCES

Patricio Ruiloba

HOUSE JUDICIARY 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 341

COMPUTER SCIENCE DEVELOPMENT GRANT PROGRAM

Debra M. Sariñana
Abbas Akhil

Jacob Candelaria

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 352

CREATE CRIME OF HAZING

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Greg Nibert

Christine Trujillo

Eliseo Lee Alcon

Susan K. Herrera

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 359

NMHU NATIVE AMERICAN SOCIAL WORK INSTITUTE

Tomás E. Salazar

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 360

EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES

Tomás E. Salazar

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Support

 

HB 363

LOTTERY FUNDS FOR TRIBAL COLLEGES

Eliseo Lee Alcon
D. Wonda Johnson

Anthony Allison

Derrick J. Lente

Harry Garcia

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 367

ENGINEERING & SURVEYING SCHOLARSHIP

Nathan P. Small
Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE LABOR, VETERANS’ AND MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 378

EMPLOYEE PREFERENCE ACT

Larry R. Scott
David M. Gallegos

Candy Spence Ezzell

James G. Townsend

HOUSE LABOR, VETERANS’ AND MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Oppose

 

HB 382

 

 

HB 394

CULTURAL & LINGUISTIC APPROPRIATE EDUCATION

Tomás E. Salazar

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 395

ACOMA-KERES LANGUAGE DICTIONARY IN SCHOOLS

Georgene Louis
Christine Trujillo

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 397

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE           Linda M. Trujillo 
                                                Christine Trujillo
   HAFC

 MINIMUM SALARIES

Support

[3] HEC/HAFC-HEC

2019 Regula

 

HB 400

SCHOOL MEDIA LITERACY ADVISORY

Antonio “Moe” Maestas
Matthew McQueen

Sheryl Williams Stapleton

Joy Garratt

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 401

SCHOOL LIBRARY WATERSHED SCIENCE CURRICULUM

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales
Nathan P. Small

Harry Garcia

HOUSE ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT & NATURAL RESOURCES 

Support

 

 

 

HB 415

TRUE TALENT ACCELERATION FUND

Nathan P. Small

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 420

SCHOOL ADVANCED PLACEMENT POLICY & REPORTING

G. Andres Romero
Raymundo Lara

Natalie Figueroa

Joy Garratt

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 431

TERMINATION OF SCHOOL EMPLOYEES

Linda M. Trujillo

HOUSE LABOR, VETERANS’ AND MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 434

CHARTER SCHOOL AUTHORIZATION MORATORIUM

Christine Trujillo
Karen C. Bash

Debra M. Sariñana

Joy Garratt

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 435

SCHOOL DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY PLANS

Patricia Roybal Caballero

HOUSE STATE GOVERNMENT, ELECTIONS & INDIAN AFFAIRS 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 447

TRACK CHILDREN BETWEEN SCHOOL & CYFD

Linda M. Trujillo
Andrea Romero

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 449

5-YEAR LITERACY INITIATIVE

Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales
Susan K. Herrera

Christine Trujillo

Anthony Allison

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

HB 454

SCHOOL DISTRICT GIFTED EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Christine Trujillo
Linda M. Trujillo

D. Wonda Johnson

Elizabeth “Liz” Thomson

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

HB 464

ENMU TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

Phelps Anderson

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HB 467

MESALANDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FACULTY POSITION

Jack Chatfield

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HJM 2

ELIMINATE NM ACHIEVEMENT GAP

Christine Trujillo

House Temporary Calendar

Support

 

HJM 4

SUPPORT SCHOOL FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE PGMS

Sheryl Williams Stapleton
Willie D. Madrid

House Calendar

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HJM 11

MIDDLE SCHOOL FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Willie D. Madrid
Raymundo Lara

HOUSE EDUCATION 

Support

 

SB 1

PUBLIC EDUCATION CHANGES

Mimi Stewart
Gay G. Kernan

William Soules

Senate Finance 

Under further review  

 

SB 14

EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES

Stuart Ingle
Tomás E. Salazar

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 22

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION & CARE DEPT.

Michael Padilla
Linda M. Trujillo

Senate Rules 

Oppose unless 4 year olds are under PED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 24

WORKPLACE HARASSMENT PREVENTION SECTION

Michael Padilla

Senate Judiciary 

Support

 

SB 26

STANDARDIZE SCHOOL BATHROOM USE POLICIES

Michael Padilla

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 31

SOCIAL WORKERS IN ALL HIGH-POVERTY SCHOOLS

Michael Padilla

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 33

HIGH SCHOOL WATER MANAGEMENT PROJECT

Michael Padilla

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 34

CIVIC LEADERSHIP & LEGISLATIVE PROCESS PGM

Michael Padilla

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 47

INCREASE SCHOOL PERSONNEL SALARIES

Mimi Stewart

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 48

STUDENT DIABETES MANAGEMENT ACT

Mimi Stewart

Chaptered

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 80

FORFEITED LOTTERY PRIZES TO TUITION FUND

William Soules

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 81

INCREASE CERTAIN SCHOLARSHIP AMOUNTS

Gay G. Kernan

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 89

NEW MEXICO RECONNECT SCHOLARSHIP ACT

Bill Tallman
Dayan Hochman-Vigil

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 103

DIGITAL TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Carlos R. Cisneros
Roberto “Bobby” J. Gonzales

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 110

NO PARCC TESTING REQUIREMENT

John M. Sapien

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

*SB 115

NEW MEXICO-GROWN PRODUCE FOR SCHOOL MEALS

Pat Woods

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 137

STATEWIDE NURSING EDUCATION APPROPRIATION

Gerald Ortiz y Pino

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 146

CREATE CRIME OF SCHOOL THREAT

Craig Brandt

Senate Public Affairs 

Oppose – overly broad and penalties too severe

 

SB 147

SCHOOL SAFETY DRILL REQUIREMENTS

Craig Brandt

Senate Calendar

Support

 

SB 156

SCHOOL BUS SEAT BELTS

William Soules

Senate Education 

Oppose

 

SB 157

SICK LEAVE FOR EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CREDIT

William Soules

Chaptered

Support

 

SB 160

STUDENT LOAN BILL OF RIGHTS ACT

Bill Tallman
Dayan Hochman-Vigil

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 163

VALENCIA COUNTY INSTRUCTIONAL CENTER

Clemente Sanchez
Alonzo Baldonado

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 179

DISABILITIES STUDENTS LOTTERY SCHOLARSHIPS

Elizabeth “Liz” Stefanics

Chaptered

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 194

SCHOOL MEDIA LITERACY PROGRAM

Carlos R. Cisneros

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 202

CHILD & FAMILY DATABANK ACT

Carlos R. Cisneros

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 204

MEDICAL MARIJUANA IN SCHOOLS

Candace Gould
Gail Armstrong

Jacob Candelaria

Senate Judiciary 

Support

 

SB 229

SCHOOL SUPPORT & ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

Mimi Stewart

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

SB 230

PRE-K CLASSROOM FACILITIES INITIATIVE

Mimi Stewart

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 231

PUBLIC SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY CALCULATIONS

Mimi Stewart

Senate Finance 

Support

 

*SB 247

TEACHER EVALUATION ACT

Mimi Stewart

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 249

YOUTH DANCE PROGRAM FOR LOW-INCOME CHILDREN

Mimi Stewart

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 251

TUITION & FEE WAIVERS FOR FOSTER CHILDREN

George K. Munoz

Senate Finance  

Support

 

SB 258

NATIVE AMERICAN SOCIAL WORK STUDIES INSTITUTE

Pete Campos

Senate Finance 

Support

 

SB 267

SCIENCE EARLY EDUCATION PILOT PROJECT

Mary Kay Papen

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 276

CREATE OFFICE OF PEACEBUILDING

Nancy Rodriguez

Senate Rules 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 279

HEALTH SECURITY ACT

Carlos R. Cisneros
Gerald Ortiz y Pino

William Soules

Richard C. Martinez

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 283

LIMIT LOTTERY OPERATIONAL EXPENSES

Jacob Candelaria
John Arthur Smith

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 286

COMMUNITY COLLEGES TO OFFER B.S. OF NURSING

Jacob Candelaria

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 288

SAFE SCHOOLS FOR ALL STUDENTS ACT

William Soules

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 293

COMMUNITY COLLEGE & TECH SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID

Nancy Rodriguez

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 295

SCHOOL FACILITIES AUTHORITY EXPENDITURES

William Soules

Senate Education  

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 298

PUBLIC PRE-KINDERGARTEN ACT

William Soules

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 304

SCHOOL PHYSICAL ED IN K-6TH GRADE

Mimi Stewart

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 308

TAX DEDUCTION OF CERTAIN BUSINESS EXPENSES

Gerald Ortiz y Pino

Senate Corporations & Transportation 

 

 

SB 310

SUPERCOMPUTING CHALLENGE

Mimi Stewart

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 311

UNM COLLEGE OF ED YAZZIE LAWSUIT NEEDS

Mimi Stewart
Antoinette Sedillo Lopez

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 315

CREATE NM SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS

Bill B. O’Neill
Linda M. Trujillo

Senate Rules 

Support

 

*SB 321

SCHOOL BUS AIR CONDITIONERS

Jeff Steinborn
Joanne J. Ferrary

Senate Finance 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 329

OPENING PUBLIC SCHOOLS ON TRIBAL LAND

Linda M. Lopez
Georgene Louis

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 331

CHARTER SCHOOL NEPOTISM & MONITORING

Linda M. Lopez

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 340

POLICIES TO DECREASE INSTITUTIONAL RACISM

Linda M. Lopez

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

SB 341

TRANSFER COMPLETED COURSE WORK

Linda M. Lopez

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 344

VOCATIONAL TRAINING PILOT AT ENMU-ROSWELL

Cliff R. Pirtle

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

SB 353

CAREER & TECH STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Pete Campos
Pat Woods

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 358

TAX REFORM

William E. Sharer

Senate Corporations & Transportation 

Oppose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 370

NORTHERN NM COLLEGE CHILD TRAUMA INSTITUTE

William Soules

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

SB 377

SCHOOL TRUE TALENT ACCELERATION FUND

George K. Munoz

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 381

ADD PUBLIC RECORD PROTECTED PERSONAL ID INFO

Pete Campos

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

SB 389

NAVAJO TECH UNIVERSITY TRADES PROGRAM

John Pinto

Senate Indian & Cultural Affairs 

Support

 

SB 391

HIGH SCHOOL G.E.D. EXTERNAL DIPLOMA

Craig Brandt

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 398

DYSLEXIC STUDENT EARLY INTERVENTIONS

Mimi Stewart

Senate Public Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


HB 397

SCHOOL EMPLOYEE MINIMUM SALARIES

Linda M. Trujillo 
Christine Trujillo

[3] HEC/HAFC-HEC

upport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 407

LOTTERY FUNDS FOR TRIBAL COLLEGES

Benny Shendo, Jr.

Senate Indian & Cultural Affairs 

Support

 

SB 420

INDIAN EDUCATION NEEDS ASSESSMENTS

Benny Shendo, Jr.

Senate Indian & Cultural Affairs 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 429

VIRTUAL CHARTER SCHOOLS

Mimi Stewart

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 431

NORTHERN NM COLLEGE BRANCH COLLEGE

Richard C. Martinez
Carlos R. Cisneros

Senate Education 

Support

 

SB 439

EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT BOARD MEMBERSHIP

Antoinette Sedillo Lopez

Senate Education 

Neutral

 

SB 441

SCHOOL SECURITY DUTY TO REPORT

George K. Munoz

Senate Education 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SB 444

ENMU TEACHER EDUCATION STUDENTS

Stuart Ingle

Senate Education 

Support

 

SJM 2

COMMIT TO ELIMINATION OF ACHIEVEMENT GAP

Michael Padilla
Christine Trujillo

Senate Education 

Support

 

SJM 3

MIDDLE SCHOOL FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCES

Clemente Sanchez

Senate Education 

Support

 

SJM 9

STUDY EXPANDING COMPUTER SCIENCE ED

Jacob Candelaria
Debra M. Sariñana

Senate Rules 

Support

 

SJR 9

PUBLIC EDUCATION COMMISSION, CA

William Soules

Senate Rules 

Support

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legislative Update for Monday and Tuesday, February 4 &  5, 2019

 

Even though the legislative session will reach the halfway point next week on February 15, things are still moving slowly as proposals wind their way through committees.  However, some education bills were included on the “so-called” rocket docket, bills that were fast tracked through one committee in each house that had been vetoed by Susanna Martinez last year.  Here are those bills:

 

 

House Bills

 

2019 Bill Number

Short Title

2019 Sponsor(s)

HB 44

Career-Technical Teacher Development

Stapleton

HB 227

Use of Teacher Attendance for Evaluations

Harper

 

Senate Bills

2019 Bill Number

Short Title

2019 Sponsor(s)

SB 48

Student Diabetes Management Act

Stewart

SB 157

Sick Leave for Educational Retirement Credit

Soules

SB 179

Disabilities Students Lottery Scholarships

Stefanics

 

 

 

We were neutral on Senate Bill 48 but supported the others.

 

The Finance committees continue to work on a final budget package behind closed doors; however, most major funding bills are currently in the House Appropriations and Finance Committee or soon will be there awaiting hearings and final work on the General Appropriations Act, House Bill 2.  You should contact members of this committee to advocate for the following:

 

Higher base salaries should not include extra workdays or time required. Compensation for any extra work days added to the current 180 days should be at the new, higher daily rates of pay provided for this session.  Salary Proposals are within the proposed budgets, and SB 1 (Stewart/Kernan); SB 47 (Stewart – this sets 45,55,65 by 2022 starting with 40,50,60 next year; and HB 171 (Stapleton Williams- extends work year to get the new salary).  Our NEA-NM position on salaries: (1) Increase statewide minimum pay levels for the three levels of Teacher Licensure to not less than $40,000, $50,000 and $60,000, increasing licensure minimum salaries beyond those rates ASAP.  (2) Establish a statewide public-school employee minimum wage of $15 per hour; and an across-the-board minimum pay increase of 10% for all public-school employees.  All school employees contribute to student success and all have more than earned an equal raise.  The Governor’s proposed six percent across the board raise is preferred to the legislature’s unequal approach.

 

House Bill 397 would start the process of getting a minimum salary for classified school employees.  It sets the minimum at $12 per hour and awaiting a hearing in the House Education Committee.

 

 

 

Update for Friday, February 1
(and talking points for testimony tomorrow at the joint House and Senate Education Hearing at the Capitol)

 

(1)“Moonshot” level overall funding increases for public education, requires stable and diverse revenue to support student needs. Both the Governor and the legislature have submitted state budgets with significant increases in overall funding for public education.  Increased stable / reliable / recurring revenue must be passed so the increased education funding is sustainable when oil prices dip, or the next recession hits.  The moonshot cannot be sustained without:

 

  1. Raise personal income taxes for those who can afford it best HB 365 (Rep. Miguel Garcia)
  2. Repeal the capital gains tax break for the investor class (Rep. Ely and Rep Angelica Rubio)
  3. Repeal the 2013 corporate tax rate cut (HB 247 – Rep Christine Chandler)
  4. Enact combined reporting of corporate taxes (SB 335 Wirth + Rep. Melanie Stansbury)
  5. Increase tobacco and eCigarette taxes (HB 261 – Rep Andrea Romero)

 

(2) Compensation and Salaries: Higher base salaries should not include extra workdays or time required. Compensation for any extra work days added to the current 180 days should be at the new, higher daily rates of pay provided for this session.  Salary roposals are within the proposed budgets, and SB 1 (Stewart/Kernan); SB 47 (Stewart – this sets 45,55,65 by 2022 starting with 40,50,60 next year; and HB 171 (Stapleton Williams- extends work year to get the new salary).  Our NEA-NM position on salaries: (1) Increase statewide minimum pay levels for the three levels of Teacher Licensure to not less than $40,000, $50,000 and $60,000, increasing licensure minimum salaries beyond those rates ASAP.  (2) Establish a statewide public school employee minimum wage of $15 per hour; and an across-the-board minimum pay increase of 10% for all public school employees.  All school employees contribute to student success and all have more than earned an equal raise.  The Governor’s proposed six percent across the board raise is preferred to the legislature’s unequal approach.
Retirement:  Support the ERB proposed fixes to solvency issues.  SB 14 (Sen. Ingle, Rep. Salazar)

 

(3) Teacher Evaluation:  Governor Lujan Grisham announced an end to the use of PARCC scores and to greatly reduce (or possibly eliminate) the use of standardized test scores in evaluation.  We prefer P.E.D., working with NEA-NM and other education stakeholders convene to create a new teacher evaluation system, rather than establishing one by statute this session. Evaluations should fairly and transparently assess educators’ performance and help educators learn and grow.  SB 247 (Sen. Stewart) our preference – it includes a council of practitioners to establish the new evaluation system.

 

(4) Community Schools: Our schools need to be fully resourced and equipped to meet the needs of every student – we need every school to be a community school. Community schools transform schools into neighborhood hubs and combine much of what we know works in education into one strategy – family engagement, wraparound services, shared leadership, culturally relevant community-based curriculum, restorative practices, extended learning, and more. HB 134 (Rep Gonzales) and HB 79 (Rep. Thomson) Funding for Community Schools was in the Governor’s proposed budget – let’s make sure the legislature appropriates that critical money!  Funding for full – time, school-based Community School Coordinators, and staff professional development is needed.   

 

(5) Education Support Professionals rights and compensation: (a) NOT yet #’d ( Natalie Figueroa) prevents ESP from having their paychecks shrink when they get a raise that moves them from one tier of the benefits contribution schedule to a higher one – i.e. a bigger portion for NMPSIA benefits.  (b) A Grow Your Own Bill, HB 20 (Rep. Joy Garrett) provides for more support Education Assistant’s to move on their path toward becoming classroom teachers! (c) A couple of bills moving forward will lower the probationary period for public school employees to match that State employees: one year, rather than three years before having due process rights for their employment.

 

 

 

Legislative Update for Thursday, January 31

 

This Saturday both the Senate Education Committee and the House Education Committees will be conducting hearings to hear from advocates for public education. Follow this link for more information

 

 

 

Today’s Legislative Updates Focuses on E.S.P. Concerns

 

 (1) NEA-NM is working with Representative Figueroa on a Proposed Bill to amend New Mexico Statute 22-29-10. Group insurance contributionsProposed Title:  “Maintain Insurance Contribution Rates as Salaries Rise”   

 

A.   Group insurance contributions for school districts, charter schools and participating entities in the authority shall be made as follows: 

 

(1)   at least seventy-five percent of the cost of the insurance of an employee whose annual salary is less than fifteen twenty thousand dollars ($15,000); ($20,000); 

 

(2)   at least seventy percent of the cost of the insurance of an employee whose annual salary is fifteen twenty thousand dollars ($15,000); ($20,000) or more but less than twenty-five thousand dollars ($20,000); ($25,000); 

 

(3)   at least sixty-five percent of the cost of the insurance of an employee whose annual salary is twenty-five thousand dollars ($20,000); ($25,000);or more but less than twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000);  thirty-thousand ($30,000) or 

 

(4)   at least sixty percent of the cost of the insurance of an employee whose annual salary is than twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000);  thirty-thousand ($30,000).  

 

B.   Within available revenue, school districts, charter schools and participating entities in the authority may contribute up to eighty percent of the cost of the insurance of all employees. 

 

 

 

The proposal above is designed to stop ESP from having their paychecks shrink when they get a raise them moves them from one tier of the schedule to a higher one – which means they pay a bigger portion for their benefits.  The proposal raises those “trigger” points up by $5,000 each for NMPSIA only.  There is a similar problem with retirement payments, to be addressed in another bill.   This bill would cover folks getting good raises over the next few years, but it’s not a permanent fix.  As soon as it gets a bill #, you’ll be informed.    

 

 

 

Members can help the “cause” of this bill by sending to Cgoodmacher@neanm.org written statements about your personal experiences after getting a raise last year, that resulted in less take home pay.   A written statement combined with copies of a pay stub from this year, and your pay stub from the prior would be perfect.

 

 

 

Please thank the sponsor, Representative Figueroa.  Phone (505) 986-4255, Email: natalie.figueroa@nmlegis.gov.  Rep Figueroa is a classroom teacher and union member in Albuquerque (AFT).

 

(2)  EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ADVANCE FOR E.S.P.!

 

There are a couple of bills moving forward designed to lower the probationary period for public school employees to match that State of New Mexico and other public employees: one year.  Currently, E.S.P. must complete three full years of employment before establishing due process rights for their employment, creating a situation where working for other employers dissuades some from filling critically needed positions in our schools.   NEA-NM is working with sponsors Representative Roybal Cabellero (pat.roybalcaballero@nmlegis.gov (505) 986-4248) and Representative L. Trujillo (linda.trujillo@nmlegis.gov, (505) 986-4436) to develop the best possible bill to achieve the goal without creating unwanted consequences. 

 

(3) Salary Raises for E.S.P. –There are multiple bills with different approaches to salary increases.  NEA-NM supports proposals for the highest minimum salaries for both teachers and E.S.P., and for the highest across the board raises for all public school employees which must be six percent (6%) or more.
The Legislative Budget Proposal calls for ESP to receive only a 4% raise, while the Governor’s budget proposal calls for a 6% raise for ESP. Also, we call for a $15 per hour minimum wage for all public school employees, and the Governor has responded with a proposal for a $12 minimum wage while the legislature’s proposed budget has no increase to it.  Please contact members of both the Finance Committees to pressure them to give equal raises for all education employees, and to establish at least the $12 per hour minimum for all school employees as proposed by the Governor:

 

 

 

Senate Finance Committee Emails: 

 

john.smith@nmlegis.gov; carlos.cisneros@nmlegis.gov; bill.burt@nmlegis.gov; pete.campos@nmlegis.gov; jacob.candelaria@nmlegis.gov; gay.kernan@nmlegis.gov; senatormunoz@gmail.com; nancy.rodriguez@nmlegis.gov; sander.rue@nmlegis.gov; john.sapien@nmlegis.gov; james.white@nmlegis.gov; steven.neville@nmlegis.gov;  

 

 

 

Senate Finance Other info: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Committee/Standing_Committee?CommitteeCode=SFC

 

House Appropriations and Finance Committee:

 

patricia.lundstrom@nmlegis.gov; roberto.gonzales@nmlegis.gov; anthony.allison@nmlegis.gov; phelps.anderson@nmlegis.gov; gail@gailfornewmexico.com; paul@paulbandy.org; c.brown.nm55@gmail.com; jackc@plateautel.net; randal.crowder@nmlegis.gov; hgarciad69@gmail.com; rodolpho.martinez@nmlegis.gov; javier.martinez@nmlegis.gov; tomas.salazar@nmlegis.gov; joseph.sanchez@nmlegis.gov; nathan.small@nmlegis.gov; melanie.stansbury@nmlegis.gov; candie.sweetser@nmlegis.gov; christine.trujillo@nmlegis.gov;

 

House Appropriation and Finance Committee other info: https://www.nmlegis.gov/Committee/Standing_Committee?CommitteeCode=HAFC

 

(4)  GROW YOUR OWN TEACHERS Bill, (HB 20) has been developed with Rep. Joy Garrett, joy.garratt@nmlegis.gov, (505) 986-4249, would provide for more to support Education Assistant’s to continue their formal higher education on a path toward becoming classroom teachers! 

 

Legislative Update for Monday, January 28

 

TAX FAIRNESS MUST RAISE SUFFICIENT REVENUE FOR STUDENT SUCCESS!

 

 

 

New Mexico students are at the center of all we do. 

 

 

 

The House Taxation and Revenue Committee will continue to hear their omnibus tax package bill, House Bill 6 which does not bring in enough revenue to create a sustainable path forward for education in New Mexico.  

 

 

 

Please contact members of the Committee, and House Leadership too, with these key points:

 

  • Education has been cut in lean years, because “there IS NOT enough money.”
  • Now, in this year with an enormous surplus, services proven to increase student success “can’t all be funded now because there MAY NOT be enough money in future years.”  
  • There is only one way to remedy the situation:  be sure to increase revenue appropriately to meet your Constitutional Obligation to sufficiently fund public education. 
  • “Competing priorities not constitutional magnitude are secondary, and the legislature may not yield to them until constitutionally sufficient provide is made for elementary and secondary education,” Judge Singleton in her Yazzie/Martinez decision.
  • Reduce the cut to the GRT from 0.5% to 0.25%. The larger amount gives away at least $400 million in revenues. Because of our history of the negative impact of these types of speculative tax cuts on our school children, we are very leery of any additional cuts such as this GRT cut.

 

  • Please increase the top personal income tax rate more than it is currently set at in the bill. 
  • Please entirely repeal the failed tax cuts for corporations. 

 

House Taxation & Revenue House Committee

 

Name

Phone

Email

Jim R. Trujillo – Comm. Chair

(505) 986-4420

jimtrujillo@msn.com

Javier Martínez

(505) 986-4236

javier.martinez@nmlegis.gov

Abbas Akhil

(505) 986-4464

abbas.akhil@nmlegis.gov

Christine Chandler

(505) 986-4226

christine.chandler@nmlegis.gov

Brian Egolf (House SPEAKER)

(505) 986-4782

brian.egolf@nmlegis.gov

Doreen Y. Gallegos (House Majority Whip)

(505) 986-4774

doreen.gallegos@nmlegis.gov

Jason C. Harper

(505) 986-4220

JasonHarperNM@gmail.com

Susan K. Herrera

(505) 986-4249

susan.herrera@nmlegis.gov

Tim D. Lewis

(505) 986-4221

lewisfornm@gmail.com

Antonio Maestas

(505) 986-4333

antonio.maestas@nmlegis.gov

Rod Montoya

(505) 986-4758

roddmontoya@gmail.com

Larry R. Scott

(505) 986-4450

larry.scott@nmlegis.gov

James R.J. Strickler

(505) 986-4220

jamesstrickler@msn.com

 

NEA-New Mexico supports other revenue increases (such as HB 261 to increase cigarette taxes and tax e-cigarettes, sponsored by Representatives Andrea Romero and Liz Thomson (both D)).

 

SB 229 (Stewart- D) Passed Senate Education Committee, 8 to 1 (Brandt – R) today and is headed to Senate Public Affairs Committee next (hearing not yet scheduled).

 

 

 

This is the beginning of the end of the punitive School Grading!  Created by an Interim Task Force that included NEA-NM President Betty Patterson, the bill acknowledges that “School climate really does drive achievement.” 

 

Rather than “grading” schools based largely on how well the students did on standardized student tests, the Dashboard provides information for parents and the community to also know if the school has the supportive resources and learning environment to provide students with a good education that inspires their natural curiosity, imagination and desire to learn. 

 

The bill requires that indicators of academic achievement include the following: Student proficiency on a New Mexico standards-based assessment; Progress of students toward proficiency;  Student “growth,” defined as a measure of the academic progress of students compared with the prior test scores of similarly performing students or to a predetermined standard; Progress of English-learning students toward English language proficiency; For high schools, four-year, five-year, and six-year cohort graduation rates.

 

Some school climate indicators included in the dashboards are: Levels of chronic absenteeism; College, career, and civic readiness; participation in advanced courses; parent and student perceptions of staff engagement; and school safety.  Schools would provide both aggregate data and data disaggregated by demographic, racial, and ethnic subgroups, including by gender, income, English proficiency, disability, and migrant status.

 

The lone Committee opponent, Republican Senator Craig W. Brandt said he voted against the bill, because “I really only care about if my children can read and if my children can do math. I don’t care if my child is happy or not …”  Committee members voting for the bill include Republican Senators Gregg Fulfer and Candace Gould, and all Democratic members: Michael Padilla, Bill B. O’Neill, John Pinto, Gabriel Ramos, Mimi Stewart and Chair William P. Soules.  

 

Next up in Senate Education Wednesday at 8:30 and NEA-NM Positions)

 

HB 44   CAREER-TECHNICAL TEACHER DEVELOPMENT (STAPLETON/STANSBURY)  Support

 

HB 227 USE OF TEACHER ATTENDANCE FOR EVALUATIONS (HARPER/ROMERO) Support

 

HB 250 AMERICAN STUDENT NEEDS ASSESSMENTS (LENTE) Support

 

SB 14   EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES (INGLE/SALAZAR) Support

 

SB 81   INCREASE CERTAIN SCHOLARSHIP AMOUNTS (KERNAN) Support

 

SB 89   NEW MEXICO RECONNECT SCHOLARSHIP ACT (TALLMAN/HOCHMAN-VIGIL) Support

 

SB 247 TEACHER EVALUATION ACT (STEWART) Support

 

 

 

The House Education Committee passed four bills today (with bi-partisan support), and with our strong support.

 

HB 111  CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC EDUCATION SUPPORT (T. SALAZAR)

 

HB 120  BILINGUAL TEACHER PREPARATION ACT (T. SALAZAR)

 

HB 159  MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION FRAMEWORK (T. SALAZAR)

 

HB 171  RAISING MINIMUM TEACHER SALARIES (S. STAPLETON WILLIAMS) 

 

A requirement for all teachers to have TESOL endorsements was removed.  We are concerned that the new licensure minimums, while sufficient, requires 10 non-instructional days to be added to a work calendar for teachers.   It increased minimum teacher salaries to $45 thousand for level 1 teachers, $55 thousand for level 2 teachers, and $65 thousand for level 3-A teachers and counselors.

 

 

 

Legislative Update for Friday, January 18

 

As the first week of the legislature comes to an end, very little action has occurred except for the introduction of legislation.  We will be busy studying the various pieces of legislation that support our legislative agenda or are counter to the agenda.  We will be preparing a list of important legislation for use at our annual legislative training at the Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe next Wednesday, January 23.    Yesterday’s Update gave a brief description of the LEFC and Governor’s budget proposals.  Follow this link to see a comparison of the dollar amounts of each proposal compared to the original proposal of the former PED administration and each other.   

 

Please mail all salary petitions to NEA-NM to arrive by next Wednesday or bring them to the training session.  Follow this link to learn more.

 

 The Senate Education Committee will meet Monday morning at 8:30 AM in room 311.  They will be beginning the process of hearing Senate Bill 1, which is the Senate leadership’s approach to meeting the sufficiency ruling on Yazzi/Martinez.  This will be the first hearing of a major approach to education transformation to meet Judge Singleton’s ruling on a sufficient education for New Mexico students.  Much in the legislation supports our legislative platform, but we think much more needs to be done and will be detailing legislation in the coming days that does just that.

 

Opening Day, January 15

As the 2019 Legislative session begins, we once again have competing budget requests from the Legislative Finance Committee and the office of the Governor. 

Follow this link  to view Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s proposal.  It contains more than $500 million in additional funding for public education, which includes a 6 percent pay increase for teachers, principals and education personnel and a raise in tiered minimum salaries to $41,000 for tier one; $50,000 for tier two; and $60,000 for tier three.  It also contains a minimum wage increase for all education personnel to $12 an hour; $113 million to increase the at-risk index in the funding formula to provide for low-income students, minority students, English language learners and students with disabilities; $60 million for increasing the number of pre-kindergarten slots, the number of high-quality Pre-K educators, and financial aid for early childhood educators; $6 million for the Indian Education Fund; and $5 million for a program to support educators who have had to fund classroom supplies out of pocket, among numerous other new or enhanced funding initiatives that will boost student achievement and learning environments.

The Legislative Finance Committee proposal can be found at this link.  It proposes an additional $416.6 million for schools, a 14.9 percent increase over current year funding, which includes $113.2 million to increase funding for the education of students at risk of failure because of low income, limited English proficiency, and transience; almost $120 million to expand the K-3 Plus extended school year program to fourth and fifth grade and to more schools; and more than $60 million for after-school enrichment programs and additional school-year days.

In addition, it includes funding to raise the minimum salary for level one teachers from $36,000 to $40,000, for level two teachers from $44,000 to $50,000, and for level three teachers from $54,000 to $60,000, and to set a minimum base of $60,000 for principals’ salaries, which are multiplied by factors that depend on the grade levels in the school.

In addition to the increases in minimum pay for teachers and principals, the committee proposes spending $161 million for a 4 percent across-the-board increase for all public school, higher education, and state employees and additional amounts to provide a 5.5 percent increase to teachers.    School employees would see additional increases through extended school year and extended school day plans that would increase the hours in their contracts.

While we think both budgets are good starting points (Certainly better than the last eight years!), we continue in our commitment to continue advocating for even larger steps forward to fully comply with the Yazzie/Martinez v. New Mexico ruling by Judge Singleton.

The most important event of the day was Governor Lujan Grisham’s State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature.  The text of the address follows:

Mr. Lieutenant Governor, Senate Pro Tem Papen, Speaker Egolf, leaders of both parties, honorable members of the judiciary, honorable tribal representatives, distinguished guests and, of course, my family:

In this moment, on this new day, we stand together on the precipice of immeasurable opportunity. I’m ready to begin the climb — and I know you are too.

Esteemed members of the House of Representatives and New Mexico Senate: There’s sixty days of hard work ahead of us. Sixty days — and each one of those days represents the chance to make a meaningful, positive difference in the lives of every single New Mexican.

Sixty days is a long time. A lot can happen. I might even start to like some of you.

I firmly believe what we accomplish in these sixty days will set the course for a transformed state, a stronger and better state, not just in these next four years but for decades, generations to come.

This, right now, is the beginning. This, right now, is our moment.

And I am humbled and honored to be a part of it, and to share it with all of you.

I know, in this first session of the 54th Legislature, we are going to remind New Mexico what it looks like when a governor and lawmakers commit to working together, commit to working through our differences and the challenges we face with open hearts, with open minds, and with understanding for the person sitting across the table, or across the aisle.

Together, we are going to show New Mexico how much good can be done when our two branches of government communicate clearly with each other, when we do the hard work to find consensus, when we win with humility and lose with grace, when we express our disagreements with civility and we always, always keep the honest, hardworking people of this state foremost in our thoughts.

I want every New Mexican out there to hear me now: Get excited. Stay excited. Get active and stay active. Please, raise your voices, and raise your hopes, and hold them up high.

And I want you, esteemed members of this Legislature, to hear me when I say: The eyes of this state are upon us.

Each of you must work for your constituents. In this moment, and in the months ahead, we must also work together for the larger constituency of New Mexico, this magnificent state we are all so lucky to call home.

It has been said that those of us who won office this fall had some pretty good timing. It has been said that we are all entering office at an opportune moment.

I agree. But this moment is greater than the state of our budget, or any of the numbers that suggest we can now begin to make the transformative investments our schools, our economy and our communities have always deserved.

I believe this is an opportune moment, perhaps the greatest moment of opportunity in the history of this state, because we have the strength, and the vision, and the willpower to deliver together.

The state of our incredible state is enthusiastic, ambitious, and ready.

I know you all share my optimism about this moment. And I believe you share my conviction that when we commit to doing the people’s business, our potential, and the positive change we can make for this state, is absolutely unlimited.

Responsible, game-changing investments have been waiting to be made for years, decades in some cases. Our shared priority is progress. We have every tool at our disposal, right now, and it’s time to begin.

When I unveiled my budget last week, I showed you I meant what I said in my inaugural address. We are aiming high, and I invite you to aim high right alongside me.

We are going to deliver a moonshot for public education in the state of New Mexico: A half billion dollars for our classrooms, new money, put to its best possible use, right now.

The transformation starts on the front lines, in our schools, in each and every classroom. For too long, the educators of New Mexico have been underpaid. On too many occasions, they have had to reach deep into their own pockets to buy necessary supplies for their students.

Things can and will be different, and better, starting now. We are going to raise our educators’ salaries by 6 percent across the board. And on top of that we are going to raise the minimum salaries for every level of educators by at least 10 percent.

And we’re putting $5 million into a fund for teachers to buy supplies for their classrooms – so that they are no longer paying out of pocket. We are raising our principals’ minimum salaries and instituting a $12 minimum wage for every level of educational personnel — everyone in the school buildings.

We do this because we will no longer just say we value the professionals in our schools — we will show them. We need our educators, who are truly the best in the nation, to know this state will support them and treat them with the respect they deserve and have always deserved. We need our diligent, professional school workers to know this state recognizes the impact they have on our children, on our future. No more lip service. We are putting our values into action. When we commit to paying our educators and school personnel more, we show them they are wanted here, that they are needed here — and that we know they are on the front lines of change in this state, and will be compensated like it.

To truly and meaningfully transform public education, we must be proactive, and we must begin at the beginning. The research is unanimous and unequivocal: Children who attend preschool are far better prepared than those who don’t. It’s really as simple as that. And we can make that a reality for every single New Mexico three- and four-year old.

As if that weren’t enough, research has also shown children who come from poor and disadvantaged families have the most to gain from preschool — as do dual-language learners and Spanish-speaking children. This is not a discussion to have in the abstract: These are real children, in our state, who need a better start, right now — a better start this state can provide for them, every single one of them.

And so we will provide for them. Together, we will do this. This is the session, this is the year, this is the moment we put New Mexico on the path to universal pre-k for every New Mexico child.

We need the classroom slots, we need the educators, and we need the educators who will educate the educators. My budget calls for investing $60 million in new pre-k classroom slots so we increase our statewide enrollment to 80 percent within the next five years. And that includes money for early childhood educator scholarships, so that we are proactively building and supporting the next generation of top-flight educators in this state.

I’ve also proposed $120 million of new funding for K-5 plus, a highly effective program targeted at young at-risk students. These are investments worth making a hundred times over.

We may disagree on how we get there, but we all recognize that early childhood education is the foundation of everything else we want to achieve for our children and our families.

We need to target our resources to communities that are currently underserved. Our most vulnerable populations need us to deliver. I intend to eliminate the term “achievement gap” from our vocabulary — because it is within our power to close those gaps, and ensure that every child, every student, every young adult in New Mexico has every opportunity, no matter where they come from.

That is why I have proposed an almost 200 percent increase in our Indian Education Fund. Our Native American students will not be left behind.

And an additional $55 million for our bilingual and multicultural programs, training more dual-language qualified teachers and ensuring bilingual families will not be left behind. Together, we will hold up this state’s diversity as our strength and our lifeblood. Let our unique multicultural identity be a shining light for this country. Let us show the world how inclusion and empowerment make all of us stronger.

And I call on this Legislature to explore every possible viable approach for educational empowerment, including a proposed constitutional amendment that will allow us to take a responsible pinch of additional money from our Permanent School Fund, ensuring we can deliver an education system that works for every child and every family in this state.

The time is now. The people of this great state know that investment in our children is an absolute imperative.

A judge in Santa Fe has ordered us, all of us, to adequately provide for our at-risk students. But I didn’t need to read a judge’s order to know we can do more, we can do better, and that, in fact, we must.

On this, we can all agree: No New Mexico student should ever fall through the cracks. We must seal those cracks, and we will. Together, we will do this, and our communities will grow stronger.

I want our educators, our students, and our parents to hear me now: There will be no more high-stakes testing in the state of New Mexico.

My first executive orders put us on a path toward a more effective evaluation system and away from the harmful legacy of PARCC. I ordered our rejuvenated Public Education Department to leverage the expertise within our communities by building a new assessment system from the ground up with the direct input of our students, our teachers, our school administrators and our community experts. From now on, we will emphasize teaching, not testing — and the result will be a new day for education in New Mexico.

And I want our educators, our students and our parents to hear me again: We will do everything in our power to ensure safety in your classrooms, in your community libraries, in your homes and public spaces. We all have a Constitutional right to be safe in our communities. Four hundred New Mexicans lose their lives to gun violence every year. That is four hundred too many. Four hundred souls, four hundred futures, four hundred of our neighbors

Our Department of Health will conduct a thorough study of gun violence, and we will get the data we need as quickly as we can, but right now we will also take action where we know we must.

That means when this legislature adjourns, I expect to sign a bill that will ban those convicted of assault from purchasing or possessing a gun, I expect strengthened background checks, and I expect tighter restrictions on safekeeping to ensure children do not have access to guns in the home.

With common-sense reforms, we can build a state where people who should not have firearms, don’t, simple as that. Hunters, sportsmen and responsible gun-owners also recognize the need for New Mexico to take steps toward smart, effective gun violence prevention, and New Mexicans from every corner of the state stand with them.

Gone are the days where we settle for slogans, where we would rather look “tough on crime” than actually do the work to be smart on crime.

Instead, we will empower our local public safety officers to enact community policing reforms, and we will build solutions to the drug addiction epidemic while holding bad actors accountable.

Intelligent, evidence-based criminal justice reform is our pathway forward, and our pathway out of the violent crime that afflicts too many of our neighborhoods.

As we recognize our public safety officers who pour their heart and soul into their communities, we also must recognize that those officers need a raise. By aggressively pursuing federal grants, and responsibly using the money we have, we can implement proven recruitment and retention incentives and ensure every community in this state has the number and quality of officers it needs and deserves.

When we are smart on crime, we stay focused on repeat and violent offenders, domestic abusers, repeat drunk drivers — not the low-level and non-violent kids caught in a bad spot. We cannot give up on those kids. For those struggling with addiction within our criminal justice system, we must provide treatment. We cannot give up on someone with a disease, a disease that is all too often linked to bad circumstances, not bad character.  We will be tough on the worst criminals, smart about investments and priorities and never stop fighting to make our communities safe.

This will be the session where we begin to win the fight against the scourge of opioid addiction in our communities.

Under my proposal, we will boost prevention programs throughout the state, we will boost the availability of overdose-reversal drugs, and we will enhance intervention and addiction treatment services.

We will also crack down on the prescribers and pharmaceutical companies who do not follow the law, holding those who have unleashed this epidemic into our communities accountable.

We will be tough, yes, but we will never forget compassion. I will direct my Health Department to adopt the longstanding recommendation from the Medical Cannabis Advisory Board to include opioid addiction as a qualifying condition. (APPLAUSE) We will not stand in the way of our neighbors who are struggling with addiction and want to recover. Instead we will help them all along the way.

When I spoke with New Mexicans every day over the past two years, and frankly well before that, I heard their concerns about their health care. You have heard them too. Nowhere is this concern greater than with our behavioral health system. We may disagree from time to time about the size or role of government, but I think we all share the belief that it is a duty of the state to provide for those with mental illness, those dealing with substance abuse and their families. And we absolutely have the capacity to do so. This is basic humanity — and we will rebuild that health system, brick by brick, together, starting this session.

In this session and in the coming years, when we explore strategies that will reduce cost and increase patient access, I want us to emphasize improved patient care, better health outcomes and building sustainable relationships between patients and providers.

To that end, I have directed the Department of Health and the Human Services Department to work with the superintendent of insurance to reduce reporting requirements and burdens on our health care providers. The message to providers and patients is this: Better delivery over bureaucracy. Our providers should spend more time taking care of their patients, and our patients should spend less time worrying about what they can and can’t afford.

And let us show the women of this state that we will not allow faraway federal judges to determine autonomy over their bodies. I think you all know who I’m talking about … Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The old criminal abortion law of this state, one of only nine left in the country, must go. Bring me that bill. I will sign it.

I have outlined how we can begin to address the vacancies at our Children, Youth and Families Department. Under incredible new leadership at CYFD, we will finally be proactive in protecting our vulnerable children — 100 new positions in the Protective Services Division.

When this legislature adjourns, I expect bills on my desk that will deliver a jolt of new energy to child well-being in this state.

In the meantime, our reinvigorated Children’s Cabinet will work with key departments to ensure needs are being met, and that we are at the forefront of innovations in service. And I applaud Mayor Tim Keller for recently announcing a similar sort of idea – I encourage all public officers in New Mexico to consider how we can come together and leverage our respective positions and resources to deliver a turnaround on child well-being in the state. Together, we will get it done.

Speaking of things we will get done: Bring me that rocket docket!

These bills, which some of you worked so hard on in the recent past, include good, productive ideas for this state. Support for our land grants and acequias. A bill to support our farmers and ranchers engaged in value-added agriculture. A bill that will make grants available to nonprofits that provide legal services to low-income New Mexicans. A bill to support mid-wives in rural communities. Common-sense changes to lobbyist expenditure reports to enhance transparency.

These are measures that show we are taking the opportunity now, this session, to make positive change a reality.

And as we do the work to make this state a better and safer place to live and raise a family, we will also be aggressive in making New Mexico a better place to work and do business. Finally building a broader economy that works for all New Mexicans requires boldness from us in this session.

That means, starting now, the workers in New Mexico who earn the least will know dignity in their work.

More than 110,000 New Mexicans make $7.50 an hour. This is a poverty wage. And I do not intend to lead a state where we simply tolerate poverty in our communities.

These are our children. These are our neighbors. These are members of our extended New Mexico family.

No one who works hard in this state will be left behind — which means we will send a very clear message to New Mexico families by making $7.50 an hour a thing of the past.

Ten dollars now, 12 dollars soon, and an index to inflation so the rate is fair forever after that.

Women in this state will see equal pay in my term in office. New Mexico can and will be the national leader on gender equality.

For our tireless state employees, I have proposed tiered raises, so those who currently earn the least will see 4 percent raises, and the minimum wage for state employees will rise to $12 an hour beginning on July 1. Let’s make this happen.

I have also proposed an expansion of the Working Families Tax Credit, which we know creates a ladder out of poverty, providing child care programs so parents can continue to get meaningful support even as they do the hard work to transform themselves and their family’s fortunes for the better. These are the New Mexicans we most need to invest in: The New Mexicans who want something better for their children. We can and will help them on their way.

Our local economic development act is a great example of how public-private partnerships can elevate communities in this state — not just cities and towns but groups of people with an idea, committed entrepreneurs, who just need a little help to get going. All across this state, we have seen the positive results of our investments.

LEDA works. So, this year, let’s double it. Let’s show our New Mexico business-women and -men that we mean business. Let’s show this country that New Mexico is more than one industry, and let’s show our communities that we know local businesses provide good jobs to local residents and have a cascading positive effect on their street corner, neighborhood and region.

And we can further amplify our local businesses by investing an additional percentage point from our Severance Tax Permanent Fund, delivering $50 million straight into homegrown mom-and-pop businesses, enlivening our communities.

Meanwhile, our Job Training Incentive Program assists companies across New Mexico, especially those in our rural communities, training workers in high-paying jobs. We can and will boost our homegrown small businesses.

Our film and television industry is a powerful tool for economic development — statewide. The flurry of film activity in Santa Fe and Albuquerque can and will spread all over this state, and when we lift the rebate cap the industry in our state will be broader, including our pueblos and tribes, our rural communities, workers up and down the economic spectrum.

When productions come here, they put New Mexicans to work — whether you’re on a crew, whether you’re a caterer, whether you own a costume shop, whether you’re an aspiring filmmaker of your own and you need a foot in the door, an apprenticeship, an opportunity to start making your mark. Opportunity simply breeds more opportunity in this good, clean industry.

These film and television productions showcase our great outdoors to a global audience and give young New Mexicans an exciting career ladder. People in the farthest corners of this planet know New Mexico as the Great American West — because of our film industry. And people in the most important offices in Hollywood know New Mexico has the greatest crew base, greatest above-the-line talent, greatest facilities, vistas and scenery in the entire U.S.

Now we have the opportunity in the coming years to accelerate. Filmmakers have put millions of dollars into our local economies. But that poorly designed cap on what we can rebate in any given year has left us with a hefty unpaid tab. In New Mexico, we keep our promises. And now we will build a smarter system to ensure we keep New Mexicans working. I call on you to embrace the aggressive and proactive plan I laid out in my budget: We will pay off the backlog left to us by the previous administration — all of it, this year.

Because I want Hollywood to hear me, I want talented young New Mexican writers, producers and actors to hear me, I want moviemakers across the globe to hear me: We are open for business, bring your cameras.

I would like to address the veterans who are here and who are listening out there: Thank you. Thank you for your incredible service and sacrifice. I have directed our state personnel office to formulate a policy that will lead to more veterans being hired by our state agencies. And our Department of Veterans Services, under bold new leadership, will be significantly strengthened, playing an active role in the lives of our veterans, from college education to health care to caregiving assistance and more. Our veterans have given everything for us; now it is our turn to give back. Thank you, again.

When I was secretary of aging, I had the privilege of learning directly from tribal elders about tribal sovereignty and the importance of government-to-government relations. Under this administration, we will see a full restoration of positive, collaborative relationships between the state and our tribes. We will rebuild an effective inter-governmental framework by working directly with the sovereign Native nations of New Mexico. No more disregard, no more disrespect. Let us begin renewing these essential relationships, starting today.

Let us also take the time in this session to recognize our infrastructure needs — and to act with the sense of urgency the situation demands. Too many of our bridges are rated structurally deficient. Too many of our roads are in bad shape, endangering drivers, even cyclists and pedestrians. We have improvements to make to our water systems, our dams, our school buildings, broadband internet in our rural communities — all of these items need our attention, right now. 

We have a chance to transform our infrastructure to promote and leverage serious economic development while we address critical community needs. I call on you to work with me in expanding and fast-tracking these investments. Infrastructure is the bedrock of our communities and our state. It is the foundation of the diversified economic growth we all envision. We must make these critical investments in safer communities and a stronger economy.

For the thousands of federal workers in this state who have seen their lives unfairly held hostage by this unnecessary government shutdown, this state will step up wherever we can. Indeed, in some ways we already have. While other states are scrambling to preserve federal funds and programs that are now at risk, New Mexico is taking charge and demonstrating proactive leadership amid the chaos.

Almost 500 staff members at the Human Services Department have been working overtime through the weekend to ensure tens of thousands of New Mexico families will continue to receive their food benefits.

Our Department of Health worked overtime to ensure our Women, Infants and Children program recipients will continue to receive benefits into April.

Our Department of Workforce Solutions has waived the work search requirement for the 1,000-plus federal employees who have filed for unemployment benefits, making it a little bit easier for hard-working breadwinners who have it so hard right now.

And we will continue to build on this effort as long as the shutdown lasts.

Our great outdoors rival any in the world. Outdoor recreation is an opportunity begging for investment. When we install an outdoor recreation coordinator in this state, that office will make sure New Mexico is on the map for bikers, hikers, campers, hunters and fishermen and fisherwomen the world over. And when we boost our tourism marketing campaigns, we will show more of the world how beautiful our state is, and how badly they need to come visit.

But if we want to show off our wide-open spaces, we’ve got to keep preservation on the front burner. The U.S. Climate Alliance is a bipartisan group of governors who have committed to upholding the goals of the Paris Climate Agreement, and New Mexico will join it. I will sign an executive order committing us to those goals in the very near future.

And I will direct each state agency to participate in developing a comprehensive climate plan for New Mexico that responds to the threat of a warming planet by reducing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas pollution.

Because we know we cannot rely on the federal government, right now, to lead on climate action. It is our responsibility and indeed our moral obligation to ensure our planet and our state are preserved for our children and their children.

I have committed to increasing our renewable portfolio standard — 50 percent renewable energy by 2030 and 80 percent 10 years after that, and I ask you to fulfill that commitment with me. Not as a ceiling but a starting point, with an ultimate goal of even greater renewable production. This is our promise to future generations of New Mexicans.

Because clean energy is the future, and we all know New Mexico has the sunshine and the wind capacity to be a global leader in this new era. There are other steps we can take to reduce our carbon footprint and ensure we get on and stay on the right path. Our state buildings can be more energy-efficient. Wasteful methane emissions can be cut, and in the process this state will make more money and more New Mexicans will be put to work.

As I have said, this is a rare moment in New Mexico’s history. The ideas we put into action beginning today can truly transform this state, truly reimagine our education system, broaden our economy and our energy sector and help us realize our potential.

However, I know most of you, and I know you have your own ideas, policies, proposals and programs to move New Mexico forward. I recognize that many of you may share my enthusiasm but not my exact roadmap for how we move ahead. I get that. In the sixty days ahead, I promise you this: I will listen as much as I talk. Really, I promise. I want to learn from you and incorporate as many of your good ideas into mine, into solid legislation and policymaking for New Mexico.

We will be bold and prudent. We will be aggressive and smart. We will be fearless and well prepared.

Above all else, in this forthcoming period of hard work and beyond, let us remember the people who sent us here. Let all of us, Republicans and Democrats, keep in mind, all through these long days and nights, the New Mexicans we are here to represent. The children who deserve the best possible educational system; the educators who deserve the best possible institutional support; the families who deserve safety and prosperity; the workers who deserve the chance to work their way up; the veterans, police officers and firefighters who deserve our gratitude; the small-business owners who deserve our support; the New Mexicans who simply want to see their vision of a healthier, happier state come to fruition.

We are those New Mexicans. In this room, there are educators, there are public safety officers, coaches, doctors, lawyers — a lot of lawyers, actually.

Together, we can and will show New Mexico and this country what good government looks like. We can and will serve as a reminder that progress happens collaboratively. We can and will do the work to make this Day One of the brand new Nuevo Mexico.

Thank you, and let’s get to work.

 

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